Royalties similar to or like Aurangzeb

The sixth Mughal emperor, who ruled over almost the entire Indian subcontinent for a period of 49 years. Wikipedia

  • Mughal Empire

    Early modern empire in South Asia. For some two centuries, the empire stretched from the outer fringes of the Indus basin in the west, northern Afghanistan in the northwest, and Kashmir in the north, to the highlands of present-day Assam and Bangladesh in the east, and the uplands of the Deccan plateau in south India. Wikipedia

  • Mughal emperors

    The Mughal emperors (or Moghul) built and ruled the Mughal Empire on the Indian subcontinent, mainly corresponding to the modern countries of India, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Bangladesh. The Mughals began to rule parts of India from 1526, and by 1700 ruled most of the sub-continent. Wikipedia

  • Shah Jahan

    The fifth Mughal emperor, and reigned from 1628 to 1658. Under his reign, the Mughal Empire reached the peak of its cultural glory. Wikipedia

  • History of India

    About the pre-1947 history of the Indian subcontinent. For post-1947 history, see History of India (1947–present) Wikipedia

  • Akbar

    The third Mughal emperor, who reigned from 1556 to 1605. Akbar succeeded his father, Humayun, under a regent, Bairam Khan, who helped the young emperor expand and consolidate Mughal domains in India. Wikipedia

  • Bahadur Shah I

    The seventh Mughal emperor of India, ruled from 1707 until his death in 1712. In his youth, he conspired to overthrow his father Aurangzeb, the sixth Mughal emperor, and ascend to the throne. Wikipedia

  • Muhammad Azam Shah

    Briefly the Mughal emperor, who reigned from 14 March 1707 to 8 June 1707. The eldest son of the sixth Mughal emperor Aurangzeb and his chief consort Dilras Banu Begum. Wikipedia

  • Mughal architecture

    Type of Indo-Islamic architecture developed by the Mughals in the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries throughout the ever-changing extent of their empire in the Indian subcontinent. Amalgam of Islamic, Persian, Turkic and Indian architecture. Wikipedia

  • Jahangir

    The fourth Mughal Emperor, who ruled from 1605 until his death in 1627. His imperial name (in Persian) means 'conqueror of the world', 'world-conqueror' or 'world-seizer' (Jahan: world; gir: the root of the Persian verb gereftan: to seize, to grab). Wikipedia

  • Jahanzeb Banu Begum

    Mughal princess and the chief consort of Muhammad Azam Shah, the heir-apparent to Emperor Aurangzeb, who briefly became Mughal emperor in 1707. The Italian writer and traveller, Niccolao Manucci, who worked under her father, described her as being beautiful and courageous. Wikipedia

  • History of Hinduism

    The history of Hinduism covers a wide variety of related religious traditions native to the Indian subcontinent. Its history overlaps or coincides with the development of religion in the Indian subcontinent since the Iron Age, with some of its traditions tracing back to prehistoric religions such as those of the Bronze Age Indus Valley Civilization. Wikipedia

  • Muslim conquests in the Indian subcontinent

    Muslim conquests in the Indian subcontinent mainly took place from the 12th to the 16th centuries, though earlier Muslim conquests include the invasions into modern Pakistan and the Umayyad campaigns in India, during the time of the Rajput kingdoms in the 8th century. Ideological link to the suzerainty of the Abbasid Caliphate, invaded and plundered vast parts of Punjab and Gujarat, starting from the Indus River, during the 10th century. Wikipedia

  • In 1573, Akbar (1573–1605), the emperor of the Mughal Empire captured Gujarat (now a state in western India) by defeating Gujarat Sultanate under Muzaffar Shah III. Muzaffar tried to regain the Sultanate in 1584 but failed. Wikipedia

  • Dara Shikoh

    The eldest son and heir-apparent of the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan. Designated with the title Padshahzada-i-Buzurg Martaba and was favoured as a successor by his father and his older sister, Princess Jahanara Begum. Wikipedia

  • Bidar Bakht

    Mughal prince and the eldest son of Muhammad Azam Shah, who briefly became Mughal emperor in 1707. Noted for being a gallant, skilful and successful general and was regarded as the most able Mughal prince of his time. Wikipedia

  • Zeenat-un-Nissa

    Mughal princess and the second daughter of Emperor Aurangzeb and his chief consort Dilras Banu Begum. Her father conferred upon her the honorable title of Padshah Begum. Wikipedia

  • Delhi Sultanate

    Islamic empire based in Delhi that stretched over large parts of the Indian subcontinent for 320 years . Five dynasties ruled over the Delhi Sultanate sequentially: the Mamluk/Slave dynasty (1206–1290), the Khalji dynasty (1290–1320), the Tughlaq dynasty (1320–1414), the Sayyid dynasty (1414–1451), and the Lodi dynasty (1451–1526). Wikipedia

  • Mughal prince and the youngest son of Emperor Aurangzeb and his chief consort Dilras Banu Begum. Akbar led a rebellion against his father and fled the Deccan after the failure of that venture. Wikipedia

  • Muslim South Asia

    Muslim rule in the Indian subcontinent began in the course of a gradual Muslim conquest in the Indian subcontinent, beginning mainly after the conquest of Sindh and Multan led by Muhammad bin Qasim. Generally credited with laying the foundation of Muslim rule in Northern India. Wikipedia

  • One of several lists of incumbents. Early later documented rulers and dynasties who are deemed to have ruled a portion of the Indian subcontinent are included in this list. Wikipedia

  • Zeb-un-Nissa

    Mughal princess and the eldest child of Emperor Aurangzeb and his chief consort Dilras Banu Begum. Also a poet, who wrote under the pseudonym of "Makhfi" . Wikipedia

  • Muhammad Shah

    Mughal emperor from 1719 to 1748. Son of Khujista Akhtar, the fourth son of Bahadur Shah I. Wikipedia

  • Shah Alam II

    The sixteenth Mughal Emperor and the son of Alamgir II. Shah Alam II became the emperor of a crumbling Mughal empire. Wikipedia

  • Sikh Empire

    State originating in the Indian subcontinent, formed under the leadership of Maharaja Ranjit Singh, who established an empire based in the Punjab. Forged on the foundations of the Khalsa from a collection of autonomous Sikh misls. Wikipedia

  • Alamgir II

    The Mughal Emperor of India from 3 June 1754 to 29 November 1759. The son of Jahandar Shah. Wikipedia

  • List of Mughal empresses. Most of these empresses were either from branches of the Timurid dynasty or from the royal houses of the Rajputs. Wikipedia

  • Bengal Subah

    Subdivision of the Mughal Empire encompassing much of the Bengal region, which includes modern Bangladesh and the Indian state of West Bengal, between the 16th and 18th centuries. Established following the dissolution of the Bengal Sultanate, a major trading nation in the world, when the region was absorbed into one of the gunpowder empires. Wikipedia

  • History of Pakistan

    Shared with that of Afghanistan, India, and Iran. Spanning the western expanse of the Indian subcontinent and the eastern borderlands of the Iranian plateau, the region of present-day Pakistan served both as the fertile ground of a major civilization and as the gateway of South Asia to Central Asia and the Near East. Wikipedia

  • Din-i Ilahi

    Syncretic religion propounded by the Mughal emperor Akbar in 1582, intending to merge some of the elements of the religions of his empire, and thereby reconcile the differences that divided his subjects. The elements were primarily drawn from Islam, Hinduism, and Zoroastrianism, but some others were also taken from Christianity, Jainism, and Buddhism. Wikipedia

  • Mughal–Maratha Wars

    The Mughal–Maratha Wars, also called The Deccan War or The Maratha War of Independence, were fought between the Maratha Empire and the Mughal Empire from 1680 to 1707. Begun in 1680 by the Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb’s invasion of the Maratha Enclave in Bijapur, which was established by the Maratha leader Shivaji. Wikipedia

Sentences

Sentences forAurangzeb

  • This later caused the Siege of Mumbai and led the intervention of Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb, and ultimately the English company was defeated and fined.East India Company-Wikipedia
  • After a year of resistance the EIC surrendered in 1690, and the company sent envoys to Aurangzeb's camp to plead for a pardon.East India Company-Wikipedia
  • The Sikhs became a formidable military force after the death of Aurangzeb in 1707 and challenged the Mughals and later the Durrani Afghans for power in Punjab.Punjab, Pakistan-Wikipedia
  • The only divergent naming was when Mughal emperor Aurangzeb renamed the city Muhiyabad some time between 1703 and 1705 in memory of his great-grandson Muhi-ul-Milan, who died there.Pune-Wikipedia
  • After the death of Aurangzeb in 1707, the Mughal Empire's influence declined rapidly as the Hindu Maratha Empire from Deccan Plateau rose to prominence.Delhi-Wikipedia
  • On 21 September 1687, the Golconda Sultanate came under the rule of the Mughal emperor Aurangzeb after a year-long siege of the Golconda Fort.Hyderabad-Wikipedia
  • Civil wars regarding succession to the Mughal throne following Aurangzeb's death in 1707 lead to weakening control over Lahore from Delhi, and a prolonged period of decline in Lahore.Lahore-Wikipedia
  • After the death of the last great Mughal emperor Aurangzeb, in 1707, Mughal authority significantly weakened but didn't totally vanish despite Nadir Shah's invasion in 1739.Punjab, Pakistan-Wikipedia
  • With political instability in the Mughal Empire following Aurangzeb's death in 1707, Murshid Quli Khan declared Bengal's independence and named himself Nawab of Bengal.Bihar-Wikipedia
  • Aurangzeb, who was better known by his imperial title Alamgir ("Conqueror of the World"), was born at Dahod, Gujarat, and was the sixth Mughal Emperor ruling with an iron fist over most of the Indian subcontinent.Gujarat-Wikipedia
  • Following the death of Emperor Aurangzeb Alamgir and Governor Shaista Khan in the early 1700s, the region became a semi-independent state under the Nawabs of Bengal and witnessed the Maratha invasions of Bengal.Bangladesh-Wikipedia
  • Shah Jahan's son, and last of the great Mughal Emperors, Aurangzeb, further contributed to the development of Lahore.Lahore-Wikipedia
  • This imperial structure lasted until 1720, until shortly after the death of the last major emperor, Aurangzeb, during whose reign the empire also achieved its maximum geographical extent.Mughal Empire-Wikipedia
  • Jinnah had developed a close association with the ulama and upon his death was described by one such alim, Maulana Shabbir Ahmad Usmani, as the greatest Muslim after Aurangzeb and as someone who desired to unite the Muslims of the world under the banner of Islam.Pakistan-Wikipedia
  • By the end of the reign of Aurangzeb in the early 18th century, the common language around Delhi began to be referred to as Zaban-e-Urdu, a name derived from the Turkic word ordu (army) or orda and is said to have arisen as the "language of the camp", or "Zaban-i-Ordu" or natively "Lashkari Zaban".Urdu-Wikipedia
  • Following the death of Emperor Aurangzeb in the early 1700s, the proto-industrialised Mughal Bengal became a semi-independent state under the Nawabs of Bengal, and showed signs of the first Industrial revolution,.West Bengal-Wikipedia
  • During Aurangzeb's rule Rana Raj Singh I and Veer Durgadas Rathore were chief among those who defied the intolerant emperor of Delhi.Rajasthan-Wikipedia
  • Facing persecution from the Mughal Emperor, Aurangzeb, these artisans found refuge, via Murshidabad, in Patna during the late 18th century.Bihar-Wikipedia
  • From 1703 to 1705, towards the end of the 27-year-long Mughal–Maratha Wars, the town was occupied by Aurangzeb and its name was changed to Muhiyabad.Pune-Wikipedia
  • The Mughal control weakened considerably after the death of Emperor Aurangzeb in 1707.Madhya Pradesh-Wikipedia
  • Under Aurangzeb's rule, South Asia reached its zenith, becoming the world's largest economy and biggest manufacturing power, estimated over 25% of world GDP, a value higher than China's and entire Western Europe's one.South Asia-Wikipedia
  • On 21 September 1687, the Golconda Sultanate came under the rule of the Mughal emperor Aurangzeb after a year-long siege of the Golconda fort.Telangana-Wikipedia
  • In 1687, the Mughal general Kasim Khan, under orders from Aurangzeb, defeated Ekoji I, son of Shāhji, and sold Bangalore to Chikkadevaraja Wodeyar (1673–1704), the then ruler of the Kingdom of Mysore for three lakh rupees.Bangalore-Wikipedia
  • With the support of the Islamic orthodoxy, however, a younger son of Shah Jahan, Aurangzeb (reigned 1658–1707), seized the throne.Mughal Empire-Wikipedia
  • Following the death of Emperor Aurangzeb and the Governor of Bengal, Shaista Khan, the proto-industrialised Mughal Bengal became a semi-independent state under the Nawabs of Bengal, and showed signs of the world's first Industrial revolution,.West Bengal-Wikipedia
  • His successors, most notably Aurangzeb, expanded the number of subahs further through their conquests.Mughal Empire-Wikipedia
  • There were occasional exceptions such as Akbar who stopped the persecution of Hindus, and occasional severe persecution such as under Aurangzeb, who destroyed temples, forcibly converted non-Muslims to Islam and banned the celebration of Hindu festivals such as Holi and Diwali.Hindus-Wikipedia
  • Guru Hargobind's successor, Guru Har Rai, maintained the guruship in the Sivalik Hills by defeating local attempts to seize Sikh land and taking a neutral role in the power struggle between Aurangzeb and Dara Shikoh for control of the Timurid dynasty.Punjab, India-Wikipedia
  • The most successful invader Mir Jumla, a governor of Aurangzeb, briefly occupied Garhgaon (c.Assam-Wikipedia
  • In the year 1701, the Kalhora Nawabs were authorized in a firman by the Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb to administer subah Sindh.Sindh-Wikipedia

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