Music genres similar to or like Baroque music

Period or style of Western art music composed from approximately 1600 to 1750. Wikipedia

  • Classical music

    Art music produced or rooted in the traditions of Western culture, including both liturgical and secular music. Also used to refer to the period from 1750 to 1820 , this article is about the broad span of time from before the 6th century AD to the present day, which includes the Classical period and various other periods. Wikipedia

  • Johann Sebastian Bach

    German composer and musician of the Baroque period. Known for instrumental compositions such as the Brandenburg Concertos and the Goldberg Variations, and for vocal music such as the St Matthew Passion and the Mass in B minor. Wikipedia

  • Composer

    Person who writes music, especially classical music in any form, including vocal music (for a singer or choir), instrumental music, electronic music, and music which combines multiple forms. A composer may create music in any music genre, including, for example, classical music, musical theatre, blues, folk music, jazz, and popular music. Wikipedia

  • Western canon

    Body of high culture literature, music, philosophy, and works of art that is highly valued in the West: works that have achieved the status of classics. However, not all these works originate in the Western world, and such works are also valued throughout the world. Wikipedia

  • Choir

    Musical ensemble of singers. Music written specifically for such an ensemble to perform. Wikipedia

  • Baroque

    Style of architecture, music, dance, painting, sculpture and other arts that flourished in Europe from the early 17th century until the 1740s. In the territories of the Spanish and Portuguese empires including the Iberian Peninsula it continued, together with new styles, until the first decade of the 1800s. Wikipedia

  • Timeline of musical events

    This page indexes the individual year in music pages. 1959 in music, 1959 in British music, 1959 in Norwegian music Wikipedia

  • Chaconne

    Type of musical composition popular in the baroque era when it was much used as a vehicle for variation on a repeated short harmonic progression, often involving a fairly short repetitive bass-line (ground bass) which offers a compositional outline for variation, decoration, figuration and melodic invention. In this it closely resembles the passacaglia. Wikipedia

  • Opera

    Form of theatre in which music has a leading role and the parts are taken by singers, but is distinct from musical theatre. Typically a collaboration between a composer and a librettist and incorporates a number of the performing arts, such as acting, scenery, costume, and sometimes dance or ballet. Wikipedia

  • Orchestra

    Large instrumental ensemble typical of classical music, which combines instruments from different families, including bowed string instruments such as the violin, viola, cello, and double bass, woodwinds such as the flute, oboe, clarinet and bassoon, brass instruments such as the horn, trumpet, trombone and tuba, and percussion instruments such as the timpani, bass drum, triangle, snare drum, cymbals, and mallet percussion instruments each grouped in sections. Other instruments such as the piano and celesta may sometimes appear in a fifth keyboard section or may stand alone, as may the concert harp and, for performances of some modern compositions, electronic instruments. Wikipedia

  • Sheet music

    Handwritten or printed form of musical notation that uses musical symbols to indicate the pitches, rhythms, or chords of a song or instrumental musical piece. Paper , although the access to musical notation since the 1980s has included the presentation of musical notation on computer screens and the development of scorewriter computer programs that can notate a song or piece electronically, and, in some cases, "play back" the notated music using a synthesizer or virtual instruments. Wikipedia

  • George Frideric Handel

    German-born Baroque composer becoming well known for his operas, oratorios, anthems, concerti grossi and organ concertos. Handel received his training in Halle and worked as a composer in Hamburg and Italy before settling in London in 1712, where he spent the bulk of his career and became a naturalised British subject in 1727. Wikipedia

  • Madrigal

    Secular vocal music composition of the Renaissance and early Baroque (1600–1750) eras. Unaccompanied, and the number of voices varies from two to eight, but usually features three to six voices, whilst the metre of the madrigal varied between two or three tercets, followed by one or two couplets. Wikipedia

  • Music of Germany

    Germany claims some of the most renowned composers, singers, producers and performers of the world. Largest music market in Europe, and third largest in the world. Wikipedia

  • Women in music

    Women in music describes the role of women as composers, songwriters, instrumental performers, singers, conductors, music scholars, music educators, music critics/music journalists and in other musical professions. As well, it describes music movements (e.g., women's music, which is music written and performed by women for women), events and genres related to women, women's issues and feminism. Wikipedia

  • Glossary of music terminology

    List of musical terms that are likely to be encountered in printed scores, music reviews, and program notes. Most of the terms are Italian (see also Italian musical terms used in English), in accordance with the Italian origins of many European musical conventions. Wikipedia

  • Basso continuo

    Basso continuo parts, almost universal in the Baroque era (1600–1750), provided the harmonic structure of the music by supplying a bassline and a chord progression. Often shortened to continuo, and the instrumentalists playing the continuo part are called the continuo group. Wikipedia

  • Sonata

    Sonata (Italian:, pl. sonate; from Latin and Italian: sonare [archaic Italian; replaced in the modern language by suonare], "to sound"), in music, literally means a piece played as opposed to a cantata (Latin and Italian cantare, "to sing"), a piece sung. The term evolved through the history of music, designating a variety of forms until the Classical era, when it took on increasing importance. Wikipedia

  • Transition from Renaissance to Baroque in instrumental music

    In the years centering on 1600 in Europe, several distinct shifts emerged in ways of thinking about the purposes, writing and performance of music. Partly these changes were revolutionary, deliberately instigated by a group of intellectuals in Florence known as the Florentine Camerata, and partly they were evolutionary, in that precursors of the new Baroque style can be found far back in the Renaissance, and the changes merely built on extant forms and practices. Wikipedia

  • Dutch harpsichordist, fortepianist, conductor and composer of music written in the baroque and classical idioms of the 17th and 18th century. In the late '70s, Hendrik Bouman studied at the Amsterdam Conservatory with several of the pioneers of the baroque revival, notably Ton Koopman and Lucie van Dael, and followed masterclasses, with Gustav Leonhardt, Nikolaus Harnoncourt and Max van Egmond. Wikipedia

  • Chamber music

    Form of classical music that is composed for a small group of instruments—traditionally a group that could fit in a palace chamber or a large room. Performed by a small number of performers, with one performer to a part . Wikipedia

  • Short piece of music, the form of which may vary from piece to piece. The prelude may be thought of as a preface. Wikipedia

  • Jordi Savall

    Catalan conductor, composer and viol player. He has been one of the major figures in the field of Western early music since the 1970s, largely responsible for popularizing the viol family of instruments (notably the viola da gamba) in contemporary performance and recording. Wikipedia

  • Concerto

    Instrumental composition, written for one or more soloists accompanied by an orchestra or other ensemble. The typical three-movement structure, a slow movement (e.g., lento or adagio) preceded and followed by fast movements (e.g. presto or allegro), became a standard from the early 18th century. Wikipedia

  • Fugue

    Contrapuntal compositional technique in two or more voices, built on a subject that is introduced at the beginning in imitation (repetition at different pitches) and which recurs frequently in the course of the composition. Not to be confused with a fuguing tune, which is a style of song popularized by and mostly limited to early American music and West Gallery music. Wikipedia

  • La Petite Bande

    Belgium-based ensemble specialising in music of the Baroque and Classical era played on period instruments. They are particularly known for their recordings of works by Corelli, Rameau, Handel, Bach, Haydn, and Mozart. Wikipedia

  • Harpsichord

    Musical instrument played by means of a keyboard. This activates a row of levers that turn a trigger mechanism that plucks one or more strings with a small plectrum made from quill or plastic. Wikipedia

  • Symphony

    Extended musical composition in Western classical music, written by composers, most often for orchestra. Although the term has had many meanings from its origins in the ancient Greek era, by the late 18th century the word had taken on the meaning common today: a work usually consisting of multiple distinct sections or movements, often four, with the first movement in sonata form. Wikipedia

  • List of composers of the Classical music era, roughly from 1730 to 1820. Prominent composers of the Classical era include Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, Johann Stamitz, Joseph Haydn, Johann Christian Bach, Antonio Salieri, Muzio Clementi, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Luigi Boccherini, Ludwig van Beethoven, Nicolo Paganini, Gioachino Rossini and Franz Schubert. Wikipedia

Sentences

Sentences forBaroque music

  • The Roman School was a group of composers of predominantly church music, which were active in the city during the 16th and 17th centuries, therefore spanning the late Renaissance and early Baroque eras.Rome-Wikipedia
  • At the time he began composing, European music was dominated by the style galant, a reaction against the highly evolved intricacy of the Baroque.Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart-Wikipedia
  • The operas in the Met's repertoire consist of a wide range of works, from 18th-century Baroque and 19th-century Bel canto to the Minimalism of the late 20th and 21st century.Metropolitan Opera-Wikipedia
  • Early English composers in classical music include Renaissance artists Thomas Tallis and William Byrd, followed up by Henry Purcell from the Baroque period.England-Wikipedia
  • The Jesuits staged the first theatre productions in the town, fostered the development of Baroque music, and established Catholic schools.Ljubljana-Wikipedia
  • This undoubtedly played a significant part in forming Felix Mendelssohn's musical tastes, as his works reflect this study of Baroque and early classical music.Felix Mendelssohn-Wikipedia

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