Scientists similar to or like Edward Teller

Hungarian-American theoretical physicist who is known colloquially as "the father of the hydrogen bomb" (see the Teller–Ulam design), although he did not care for the title, considering it poor taste. Wikipedia

  • John von Neumann

    Hungarian-American mathematician, physicist, computer scientist, engineer and polymath. Generally regarded as the foremost mathematician of his time and said to be "the last representative of the great mathematicians". Wikipedia

  • Enrico Fermi

    Italian (later naturalized American) physicist and the creator of the world's first nuclear reactor, the Chicago Pile-1. He has been called the "architect of the nuclear age" and the "architect of the atomic bomb". Wikipedia

  • Hans Bethe

    German-American nuclear physicist who made important contributions to astrophysics, quantum electrodynamics, and solid-state physics, and who won the 1967 Nobel Prize in Physics for his work on the theory of stellar nucleosynthesis. Professor at Cornell University. Wikipedia

  • J. Robert Oppenheimer

    American theoretical physicist and professor of physics at the University of California, Berkeley. The wartime head of the Los Alamos Laboratory and is among those who are credited with being the "father of the atomic bomb" for their role in the Manhattan Project, the World War II undertaking that developed the first nuclear weapons. Wikipedia

  • John Archibald Wheeler

    American theoretical physicist. Largely responsible for reviving interest in general relativity in the United States after World War II. Wikipedia

  • Eugene Wigner

    Hungarian-American theoretical physicist and also contributed to mathematical physics. He received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1963 "for his contributions to the theory of the atomic nucleus and the elementary particles, particularly through the discovery and application of fundamental symmetry principles". Wikipedia

  • Stanislaw Ulam

    Polish-American scientist in the fields of mathematics and nuclear physics. He participated in the Manhattan Project, originated the Teller–Ulam design of thermonuclear weapons, discovered the concept of the cellular automaton, invented the Monte Carlo method of computation, and suggested nuclear pulse propulsion. Wikipedia

  • Marshall Rosenbluth

    American plasma physicist and member of the National Academy of Sciences. Awarded the National Medal of Science for discoveries in controlled thermonuclear fusion, contributions to plasma physics, and work in computational statistical mechanics. Wikipedia

  • Richard Feynman

    American theoretical physicist, known for his work in the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics, the theory of quantum electrodynamics, the physics of the superfluidity of supercooled liquid helium, as well as his work in particle physics for which he proposed the parton model. For contributions to the development of quantum electrodynamics, Feynman received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1965 jointly with Julian Schwinger and Shin'ichirō Tomonaga. Wikipedia

  • Luis Walter Alvarez

    American experimental physicist, inventor, and professor who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1968 for development of the hydrogen bubble chamber enabling discovery of resonance states in particle physics. One of the most brilliant and productive experimental physicists of the twentieth century." Wikipedia

  • Military history of Jewish Americans

    Jewish Americans have served in the United States armed forces dating back to before the colonial era, when Jews had served in militias of the Thirteen Colonies. Jewish military personnel have served in all branches of the armed forces and in every major armed conflict to which the United States has been involved. Wikipedia

  • Rudolf Peierls

    German-born British physicist who played a major role in the Manhattan Project and Tube Alloys, Britain's nuclear programme. His obituary in Physics Today described him as "a major player in the drama of the eruption of nuclear physics into world affairs". Wikipedia

  • Leo Szilard

    Hungarian-American physicist and inventor. He conceived the nuclear chain reaction in 1933, patented the idea of a nuclear fission reactor in 1934, and in late 1939 wrote the letter for Albert Einstein's signature that resulted in the Manhattan Project that built the atomic bomb. Wikipedia

  • Isidor Isaac Rabi

    American physicist who won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1944 for his discovery of nuclear magnetic resonance, which is used in magnetic resonance imaging. Also one of the first scientists in the United States to work on the cavity magnetron, which is used in microwave radar and microwave ovens. Wikipedia

  • Niels Bohr

    Danish physicist who made foundational contributions to understanding atomic structure and quantum theory, for which he received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1922. Also a philosopher and a promoter of scientific research. Wikipedia

  • Henry DeWolf Smyth

    American physicist, diplomat, and bureaucrat. He played a number of key roles in the early development of nuclear energy, as a participant in the Manhattan Project, a member of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), and U.S. ambassador to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Wikipedia

  • Robert R. Wilson

    American physicist known for his work on the Manhattan Project during World War II, as a sculptor, and as an architect of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), where he was the first director from 1967 to 1978. A graduate of the University of California, Berkeley (BA and PhD), Wilson received his doctorate under the supervision of Ernest Lawrence for his work on the development of the cyclotron at the Berkeley Radiation Laboratory. Wikipedia

  • Ernest Lawrence

    Pioneering American nuclear scientist and winner of the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1939 for his invention of the cyclotron. Known for his work on uranium-isotope separation for the Manhattan Project, as well as for founding the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Wikipedia

  • Harold Agnew

    American physicist, best known for having flown as a scientific observer on the Hiroshima bombing mission and, later, as the third director of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Not related to U.S. Vice President Spiro Agnew. Wikipedia

  • Oppenheimer security hearing

    1954 proceeding by the United States Atomic Energy Commission that explored the background, actions, and associations of J. Robert Oppenheimer, the American scientist who had headed the Los Alamos Laboratory during World War II, where he played a key part in the Manhattan Project that developed the atomic bomb. The hearing resulted in Oppenheimer's Q clearance being revoked. Wikipedia

  • Maria Goeppert Mayer

    German-born American theoretical physicist, and Nobel laureate in Physics for proposing the nuclear shell model of the atomic nucleus. The second woman to win a Nobel Prize in physics, the first being Marie Curie. Wikipedia

  • Emilio Segrè

    Italian-American physicist and Nobel laureate, who discovered the elements technetium and astatine, and the antiproton, a subatomic antiparticle, for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1959 along with Owen Chamberlain. Born in Tivoli, near Rome, Segrè studied engineering at the University of Rome La Sapienza before taking up physics in 1927. Wikipedia

  • Marshall Holloway

    American physicist who worked at the Los Alamos Laboratory during and after World War II. Its representative, and the deputy scientific director, at the Operation Crossroads nuclear tests at Bikini Atoll in the Pacific in July 1946. Wikipedia

  • Norris Bradbury

    American physicist who served as Director of the Los Alamos National Laboratory for 25 years from 1945 to 1970. He succeeded Robert Oppenheimer, who personally chose Bradbury for the position of director after working closely with him on the Manhattan Project during World War II. Wikipedia

  • Kenneth Bainbridge

    American physicist at Harvard University who did work on cyclotron research. His precise measurements of mass differences between nuclear isotopes allowed him to confirm Albert Einstein's mass–energy equivalence concept. Wikipedia

  • Raemer Schreiber

    American physicist from McMinnville, Oregon who served Los Alamos National Laboratory during World War II, participating in the development of the atomic bomb. Used in the bombing of Nagasaki. Wikipedia

  • David Bohm

    American scientist who has been described as one of the most significant theoretical physicists of the 20th century and who contributed unorthodox ideas to quantum theory, neuropsychology and the philosophy of mind. Too limited. Wikipedia

  • George Gamow

    Ukrainian-American theoretical physicist and cosmologist. Early advocate and developer of Lemaître's Big Bang theory. Wikipedia

  • Bruno Pontecorvo

    Italian and Soviet nuclear physicist, an early assistant of Enrico Fermi and the author of numerous studies in high energy physics, especially on neutrinos. A convinced communist, he defected to the Soviet Union in 1950, where he continued his research on the decay of the muon and on neutrinos. Wikipedia

  • Robert Bacher

    American nuclear physicist and one of the leaders of the Manhattan Project. Born in Loudonville, Ohio, Bacher obtained his undergraduate degree and doctorate from the University of Michigan, writing his 1930 doctoral thesis under the supervision of Samuel Goudsmit on the Zeeman effect of the hyperfine structure of atomic levels. Wikipedia

Sentences

Sentences forEdward Teller

  • The school also employed a number of the nation's leading scientists, including Enrico Fermi and Edward Teller, along with operating the famous Yerkes Observatory.Carl Sagan-Wikipedia
  • A personal correspondence with nuclear physicist Edward Teller around 1983 began amicably, with Teller expressing support for continued research to ascertain the credibility of the winter hypothesis.Carl Sagan-Wikipedia
  • In February 1958, Pauling participated in a publicly televised debate with the atomic physicist Edward Teller about the actual probability of fallout causing mutations.Linus Pauling-Wikipedia
  • Edward Teller and Ernest Lawrence, director of the Radiation Laboratory at Berkeley, are regarded as the co-founders of the Livermore facility.Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory-Wikipedia
  • For an example of foreign use, the birth name of the Hungarian-born physicist called the "father of the hydrogen bomb" was Teller Ede, but he immigrated to the United States in the 1930s and thus became known as Edward Teller.Hungarian language-Wikipedia
  • Briggs held a meeting on 21 October 1939, which was attended by Szilárd, Wigner and Edward Teller.Manhattan Project-Wikipedia

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