Events similar to or like Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster

2011 nuclear accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Ōkuma, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. Wikipedia

  • The following table compares the nuclear accidents at the Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima Daiichi (2011) nuclear power plants, the only INES level 7 nuclear accidents to date. Comparison of Chernobyl and other radioactivity releases Wikipedia

  • Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster (Unit 1 Reactor)

    Series of equipment failures, nuclear meltdowns, and releases of radioactive materials at the Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant, following the Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami on 11 March 2011. Largest nuclear disaster since the Chernobyl disaster of 1986. Wikipedia

  • Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    Disabled nuclear power plant located on a 3.5 km2 site in the towns of Ōkuma and Futaba in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. The plant suffered major damage from the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan on March 11, 2011. Wikipedia

  • Chernobyl disaster

    Caused by a nuclear accident that occurred on Saturday 26 April 1986, at the No. 4 reactor in the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, near the city of Pripyat in the north of the Ukrainian SSR. Considered the worst nuclear disaster in history and was caused by one of only two nuclear energy accidents rated at seven—the maximum severity—on the International Nuclear Event Scale, the other being the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in Japan. Wikipedia

  • Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster (Unit 2 Reactor)

    Series of equipment failures, nuclear meltdowns, and releases of radioactive materials at the Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant, following the Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami on 11 March 2011. Largest nuclear disaster since the Chernobyl disaster of 1986. Wikipedia

  • Investigations into the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Disaster (or Accident) began on 11 March 2011 when a series of equipment failures, core melt and down, and releases of radioactive materials occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station from the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake and tsunami on the same day. Wikipedia

  • Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster casualties

    Series of equipment failures, nuclear meltdowns, and releases of radioactive materials at the Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant, following the Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami on 11 March 2011. The largest nuclear disaster since the Chernobyl disaster of 1986, and the radiation released exceeded official safety guidelines. Wikipedia

  • Nuclear power

    Use of nuclear reactions that release nuclear energy to generate heat, which most frequently is then used in steam turbines to produce electricity in a nuclear power plant. Nuclear power can be obtained from nuclear fission, nuclear decay and nuclear fusion reactions. Wikipedia

  • Fukushima disaster cleanup

    Ongoing attempt to limit radioactive contamination from the three nuclear reactors involved in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster that followed the earthquake and tsunami on 11 March 2011. Made much more difficult because of the number of simultaneous hazards concentrated in a small area. Wikipedia

  • Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster (Unit 3 Reactor)

    One of the reactors in operation on 11 March 2011, when the plant was struck by the tsunami produced by the Tohoku earthquake. In the aftermath, the reactor experienced hydrogen gas explosions and suffered a partial meltdown, along with the other two reactors in operation at the time the tsunami struck, unit 1 and unit 2. Wikipedia

  • Timeline of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster

    Multi-reactor nuclear power site in the Fukushima Prefecture of Japan. The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster occurred after a 9.0 magnitude Tōhoku earthquake and subsequent tsunami on 11 March 2011. Wikipedia

  • Japanese reaction to Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster

    The Japanese reaction occurred after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, following the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami. Declared by the government of Japan on 11 March. Wikipedia

  • Accident rating of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster

    Series of equipment failures, nuclear meltdowns, and releases of radioactive materials at the Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant, following the Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami on 11 March 2011. Largest nuclear disaster since the Chernobyl disaster of 1986. Wikipedia

  • Radiation effects from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster

    The radiation effects from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster are the observed and predicted effects as a result of the release of radioactive isotopes from the Fukushima Daiichii Nuclear Power Plant following the 2011 Tōhoku 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami (Great East Japan Earthquake and the resultant tsunami). Result of venting in order to reduce gaseous pressure, and the discharge of coolant water into the sea. Wikipedia

  • Environmental impact of nuclear power

    The environmental impact of nuclear power results from the nuclear fuel cycle, operation, and the effects of nuclear accidents. The greenhouse gas emissions from nuclear fission power are much smaller than those associated with coal, oil and gas, and the routine health risks are much smaller than those associated with coal. Wikipedia

  • Nuclear and radiation accidents and incidents

    Defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency as " an event that has led to significant consequences to people, the environment or the facility. Examples include lethal effects to individuals, large radioactivity release to the environment, reactor core melt." One in which a reactor core is damaged and significant amounts of radioactive isotopes are released, such as in the Chernobyl disaster in 1986 and Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in 2011. Wikipedia

  • This article lists notable civilian accidents involving fissile nuclear material or nuclear reactors. Military accidents are listed at List of military nuclear accidents. Wikipedia

  • Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Plant

    Nuclear power plant located on a 150 ha site in the town of Naraha and Tomioka in the Futaba District of Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. The Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) runs the plant. Wikipedia

  • Nuclear meltdown

    Severe nuclear reactor accident that results in core damage from overheating. Not officially defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency or by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Wikipedia

  • Nuclear power debate

    Long-running controversy about the risks and benefits of using nuclear reactors to generate electricity for civilian purposes. Intensity unprecedented in the history of technology controversies" in some countries. Wikipedia

  • Nuclear safety and security

    Defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency as "The achievement of proper operating conditions, prevention of accidents or mitigation of accident consequences, resulting in protection of workers, the public and the environment from undue radiation hazards". The IAEA defines nuclear security as "The prevention and detection of and response to, theft, sabotage, unauthorized access, illegal transfer or other malicious acts involving nuclear material, other radioactive substances or their associated facilities". Wikipedia

  • International reactions to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster

    The international reaction to the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster has been diverse and widespread. Ad hoc basis. Wikipedia

  • Behavior of nuclear fuel during a reactor accident

    This page describes how uranium dioxide nuclear fuel behaves during both normal nuclear reactor operation and under reactor accident conditions, such as overheating. Often very expensive to conduct, and so has often been performed on a collaborative basis between groups of countries, usually under the aegis of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development's Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations . Wikipedia

  • Fukushima 50

    Pseudonym given by English-language media to a group of employees at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Following the Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami on 11 March 2011, a related series of nuclear accidents resulted in melting of the cores of three reactors. Wikipedia

  • Windscale fire

    The worst nuclear accident in the United Kingdom's history, and one of the worst in the world, ranked in severity at level 5 out of a possible 7 on the International Nuclear Event Scale. The fire took place in Unit 1 of the two-pile Windscale facility on the northwest coast of England in Cumberland (now Sellafield, Cumbria). Wikipedia

  • Formed June 7, 2011 by the Japanese government as an independent body to investigate the March Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. Interim report in December 2011, and issued its final report in July 2012. Wikipedia

  • Nuclear fallout

    Residual radioactive material propelled into the upper atmosphere following a nuclear blast, so called because it "falls out" of the sky after the explosion and the shock wave has passed. It commonly refers to the radioactive dust and ash created when a nuclear weapon explodes. Wikipedia

  • Ōkuma, Fukushima

    Town located in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. In 2010, the town had a population of 11,515. Wikipedia

  • 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami

    Magnitude 9.0–9.1 (Mw) undersea megathrust earthquake off the coast of Japan that occurred at 14:46 JST (05:46 UTC) on Friday 11 March 2011, with the epicenter approximately 70 km east of the Oshika Peninsula of Tōhoku and the hypocenter at an underwater depth of approximately 29 km. Often referred to in Japan as the Great East Japan Earthquake and is also known as the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake, the Great Sendai Earthquake, the Great Tōhoku Earthquake, and the great earthquake of March 11. Wikipedia

  • National Diet of Japan Fukushima Nuclear Accident Independent Investigation Commission

    Commission to investigate the background and cause of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster formed by the statutory law enactment by Diet of Japan on 7 October 2011 and started with the first commissioning meeting was held in Fukushima City, Fukushima Prefecture. Scheduled to issue the report in six months on investigation and to propose the policy to reduce and prevent future accident and reduce damage on the nuclear power plant in Japan. Wikipedia

Sentences

Sentences forFukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster

  • However, as a reaction to the Fukushima nuclear disaster, the Swiss government announced in 2011 that it plans to end its use of nuclear energy in the next 2 or 3 decades.Switzerland-Wikipedia
  • Most of these deaths occurred in Fukushima prefecture, where the prefecture government has suggested that they could be due to evacuations caused by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster.2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami-Wikipedia
  • This was the only accident to receive the highest possible rating of 7 by the International Nuclear Event Scale, indicating a "major accident", until the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in March 2011.Ukraine-Wikipedia
  • This was in turn struck down by a referendum following the Fukushima nuclear accident.Italy-Wikipedia
  • On March 11, 2011, Japan suffered one of the largest earthquakes in its recorded history, triggering the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster.Japan-Wikipedia
  • A social-media employee mentioned that the subject of zombies had come up a lot on Twitter when she had been tweeting about the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster and radiation.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-Wikipedia
  • The subsequent nuclear crisis caused by the tsunami has also largely left Tokyo unaffected, despite occasional spikes in radiation levels.Tokyo-Wikipedia
  • Following the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami and the ensuing Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, special rules were implemented for the 2011 NPB season:Nippon Professional Baseball-Wikipedia
  • Following the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, the Asahi and other newspapers faced growing public criticism for adhering too closely to the government narrative during their reporting of the disaster.The Asahi Shimbun-Wikipedia
  • The organization highlights the Chernobyl nuclear disaster of 1986 and Fukushima nuclear disaster of 2011 as evidence of the risk nuclear power can pose to people's lives, the environment and the economy.Greenpeace-Wikipedia
  • The journal Nature has reported that the IAEA response to the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in Japan was "sluggish and sometimes confusing", drawing calls for the agency to "take a more proactive role in nuclear safety".International Atomic Energy Agency-Wikipedia
  • The film follows Sakamoto as he recovers from cancer and resumes creating music, protests nuclear power plants following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Disaster, and creates field recordings in a variety of locales.Ryuichi Sakamoto-Wikipedia
  • In August 2015, following 4 years of near zero fission-electricity generation, Japan began restarting its nuclear reactors, after safety upgrades were completed, beginning with Sendai Nuclear Power Plant.Nuclear power-Wikipedia
  • In September 2011, Siemens, which had been responsible for constructing all 17 of Germany's existing nuclear power plants, announced that it would exit the nuclear sector following the Fukushima disaster and the subsequent changes to German energy policy.Siemens-Wikipedia
  • The 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami and the resulting Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster caused significant damage to the prefecture, primarily but not limited to the eastern Hamadōri region.Fukushima Prefecture-Wikipedia
  • Portions of the Games are scheduled for locations that were impacted by the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami and Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster.2020 Summer Olympics-Wikipedia
  • The tsunami caused nuclear accidents, primarily the level 7 meltdowns at three reactors in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant complex, and the associated evacuation zones affecting hundreds of thousands of residents.2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami-Wikipedia
  • This move was partly in response to the 2011 Fukushima disaster, and the bill faced little opposition in the Diet.Shinzo Abe-Wikipedia
  • However, due to the slow pace of the project and problems with the sector (like Fukushima disaster and bad example of Olkiluoto plant), Eesti Energia has shifted its main focus to shale oil production that is seen as much more profitable business.Estonia-Wikipedia
  • The decisions to suspend conscription (late 2010) and to phase out nuclear energy (shortly after the Fukushima disaster in 2011) broke with long-term principles of the CDU, moving the party into a more socially liberal direction and alienating some of its more conservative members and voters.Christian Democratic Union of Germany-Wikipedia
  • The same happened after the 2011 Fukushima disaster in Fukushima, Japan.International Atomic Energy Agency-Wikipedia
  • In March 2011 (two weeks after the Fukushima nuclear disaster had begun), the Greens made large gains in Rhineland-Palatinate and in Baden-Württemberg.Alliance 90/The Greens-Wikipedia
  • Following the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in 2011 and the extended temporary closure of most Japanese nuclear plants, Hitachi's nuclear business became unprofitable and in 2016 Hitachi CEO Toshiaki Higashihara argued Japan should consider a merger of the various competing nuclear businesses.Hitachi-Wikipedia
  • Analog television shut down on 31 March 2012, in Iwate, Miyagi and Fukushima prefectures, which were heavily damaged in the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami and the nuclear accidents that followed it.Digital terrestrial television-Wikipedia
  • In March 2011, following the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, levels of radioactivity in Utsunomiya were 33 times higher than normal.Tochigi Prefecture-Wikipedia
  • It has been closed since the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster.Niigata Prefecture-Wikipedia
  • Director Hideaki Anno's 2016 film Shin Godzilla portrays the titular kaiju as a representation of disasters such as the Tōhoku earthquake and the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, and criticizes the Japanese government's response to such disasters.2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami-Wikipedia
  • It is considered the worst nuclear disaster in history and was caused by one of only two nuclear energy accidents rated at seven—the maximum severity—on the International Nuclear Event Scale, the other being the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in Japan.Chernobyl disaster-Wikipedia
  • Other environmental concerns relate to the radioactive contamination of the Arctic Ocean from, for example, Russian radioactive waste dump sites in the Kara Sea Cold War nuclear test sites such as Novaya Zemlya, Camp Century's contaminants in Greenland, or radioactive contamination from Fukushima.Arctic Ocean-Wikipedia
  • Accidents in nuclear power plants include the Chernobyl disaster in the Soviet Union in 1986, the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in Japan in 2011, and the more contained Three Mile Island accident in the United States in 1979.Nuclear power-Wikipedia

This will create an email alert.  Stay up to date on result for: Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster