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1940 dystopian novel by Swedish novelist Karin Boye, which envisions a future of drab terror. Wikipedia

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Sentences

Sentences forKallocain

  • Outside Sweden, her best-known work is probably the novel Kallocain.Karin Boye-Wikipedia
  • In Sweden she is acclaimed as a poet, but internationally she is best known for the dystopian science fiction novel Kallocain (1940).Karin Boye-Wikipedia
  • A stand again National Socialism was also made by Karin Boye in the novel Kallocain (1940) set in a future totalitarian world; the novel has since been translated into ten languages.Modernist Swedish literature-Wikipedia
  • Throughout its publication history, Nineteen Eighty-Four has been either banned or legally challenged, as subversive or ideologically corrupting, like the dystopian novels We (1924) by Yevgeny Zamyatin, Brave New World (1932) by Aldous Huxley, Darkness at Noon (1940) by Arthur Koestler, Kallocain (1940) by Karin Boye and Fahrenheit 451 (1953) by Ray Bradbury.Nineteen Eighty-Four-Wikipedia

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