Military people similar to or like Leonard Cheshire

Highly decorated Royal Air Force (RAF) pilot and group captain during the Second World War, and a philanthropist. Wikipedia

  • James Brian Tait

    Officer in the Royal Air Force during and after the Second World War. He conducted 101 bombing missions during the war, including the one that finally sank the German battleship Tirpitz in 1944. Wikipedia

  • Guy Gibson

    Distinguished bomber pilot in the Royal Air Force during the Second World War. The first Commanding Officer of No. 617 Squadron, which he led in the "Dam Busters" raid in 1943, resulting in the breaching of two large dams in the Ruhr area of Germany. Wikipedia

  • Douglas Bader

    Royal Air Force flying ace during the Second World War. Credited with 22 aerial victories, four shared victories, six probables, one shared probable and 11 enemy aircraft damaged. Wikipedia

  • George Holden (RAF officer)

    British aviator and a pilot in RAF Bomber Command during the Second World War. Briefly commander of No. 617 Squadron RAF—"The Dam Busters"—before his death. Wikipedia

  • Percy Charles Pickard

    Officer in the Royal Air Force during the Second World War. The first officer of the RAF to be awarded the DSO three times during the Second World War. Wikipedia

  • John Cunningham (RAF officer)

    Royal Air Force (RAF) night fighter ace during the Second World War and a test pilot. Nicknamed "Cat's Eyes" by the British press to explain his successes and to avoid communicating the existence of airborne radar to the enemy. Wikipedia

  • Johnnie Johnson (RAF officer)

    English Royal Air Force (RAF) pilot and flying ace—defined as a pilot that has shot down five or more enemy aircraft in aerial combat—who flew and fought during the Second World War. Educated in the East Midlands, where he qualified as an engineer. Wikipedia

  • Dinghy Young

    Bomber pilot in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve during the Second World War. Born in Belgravia, London, to Henry George Melvin Young, a British solicitor, and Fannie Rowan Young. Wikipedia

  • Colin Falkland Gray

    Royal Air Force (RAF) officer and the top New Zealand fighter ace of the Second World War. Accepted into the RAF in 1939 on a short service commission, after two previous attempts failed on medical grounds. Wikipedia

  • Alan Deere

    New Zealand fighter ace with the Royal Air Force (RAF) during the Second World War. Also notable for the number of near death experiences he had during the course of the war. Wikipedia

  • Hamish Mahaddie

    Scotsman who served in the Royal Air Force (RAF). Selected for an apprentice program and was trained as an RAF ground crew "metal rigger". Wikipedia

  • American bomber pilot who served with the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) and Royal Air Force (RAF) during the Second World War. Conscripted by the United States Army in April 1941 but, wanting to fly, he absconded to Canada and joined the Royal Canadian Air Force . Wikipedia

  • Allan Wright

    Royal Air Force (RAF) fighter pilot and flying ace of the Second World War. One of the last surviving airmen called The Few who served in the Battle of Britain. Wikipedia

  • Keith Hampshire (RAAF officer)

    Pilot and ace of the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) during the Second World War. He saw action in twin-engine propellor-driven aircraft, flying intruder, ground attack and night fighter missions. Wikipedia

  • Walter Churchill

    Royal Air Force pilot and flying ace during the Second World War. The elder brother of Peter Churchill and Oliver Churchill, both of whom were Special Operations Executive officers during the Second World War. Wikipedia

  • Hugh Dundas

    Fighter pilot in the Royal Air Force (RAF) during the Second World War and later a senior broadcasting executive. Promoted to squadron leader and awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross at the age of 21, advanced to wing commander at 22 and, at 23, was awarded the Distinguished Service Order and became one of the youngest group captains in the RAF. Wikipedia

  • John Grigson

    Highly decorated British pilot who served in the Royal Naval Air Service and Royal Air Force in World War I, continuing his service and serving in World War II until his death in an air crash in 1943. Born in 1893 in the Vicarage at Pelynt, Cornwall, to Rev. Canon William Shuckforth Grigson M.A. and Mary Beatrice Boldero, and was one of seven brothers, including Geoffrey Grigson, Kenneth Grigson and Wilfrid Grigson. Wikipedia

  • Ken Gatward

    British Royal Air Force (RAF) pilot of the Second World War. Chief Inspector of police. Wikipedia

  • Harry Day

    Royal Marine and later an Royal Air Force pilot during the Second World War. Senior British officer in a number of camps and a noted escapee. Wikipedia

  • Handley Page Halifax

    British Royal Air Force four-engined heavy bomber of the Second World War. Developed by Handley Page to the same specification as the contemporary twin-engine Avro Manchester. Wikipedia

  • Peter Stanley James

    Pilot in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve during the Second World War, flying in RAF Bomber Command with No. 35 Squadron, No. 78 Squadron and No. 148 Squadron. Captain of Handley Page Halifax L9500 during a daylight raid against the German battleship, flew in all three thousand bomber raids and was one of the first pilots to take the Handley Page Halifax into battle. Wikipedia

  • Eric Lock

    Royal Air Force (RAF) fighter pilot and flying ace of the Second World War. Born in Shrewsbury in 1919 Lock had his first experience of flying as a teenager. Wikipedia

  • Jimmy Marks (RAF officer)

    Officer in the Royal Air Force. The commanding officer of 35 Squadron when it was selected as one of the five founding squadrons of the Pathfinder Force. Wikipedia

  • Adrian Warburton

    Royal Air Force (RAF) pilot and flying ace of the Second World War. Described by the then Air Officer Commanding in Chief Middle East, Air Marshal Sir Arthur Tedder, as 'the most important pilot in the RAF'. Wikipedia

  • John Braham (RAF officer)

    Royal Air Force (RAF) night fighter pilot and fighter ace during the Second World War. Born in April 1920. Wikipedia

  • W. G. G. Duncan Smith

    Royal Air Force flying ace of the Second World War. The father of Iain Duncan Smith, Member of Parliament since 1992 and Leader of the Conservative Party from 2001 to 2003. Wikipedia

  • Edward Wells (pilot)

    New Zealand flying ace of the Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) during the Second World War. Credited with the destruction of twelve enemy aircraft. Wikipedia

  • No. 4 Group RAF

    Royal Air Force group, originally formed in the First World War, and reformed in the wake of the Second World War, mostly part of RAF Bomber Command, but ending its days in RAF Transport Command. Originally formed in October 1918 at the Seaplane Experimental Station, Felixstowe just before the end of the First World War and disbanded a year later in 1919. Wikipedia

  • List of RAF squadron codes

    Most units of the Royal Air Force are identified by a two character alphabetical or alpha- numeric combination squadron code. Painted on the aircraft belonging to that unit. Wikipedia

  • Thomas W. Horton (RAF officer)

    Retired Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) officer, pilot, and combat veteran who served with the Royal Air Force (RAF) in a number of significant engagements during the Second World War. Member of No. 88 Squadron RAF and flew anti-ship missions in the Bristol Blenheim and Douglas Boston. Wikipedia

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