Short stories similar to or like Liar! (short story)

Science fiction short story by American writer Isaac Asimov. Wikipedia

  • Science fiction short story by American writer Isaac Asimov. It first appeared in the June 1950 issue of Astounding Science Fiction and subsequently appeared in the collections I, Robot (1950), The Complete Robot (1982), and Robot Visions (1990). Wikipedia

  • Science fiction short story by American writer Isaac Asimov. His first robot story and writing commenced on June 10, 1939. Wikipedia

  • Science fiction short story by American writer Isaac Asimov. First published as "Paradoxical Escape" in the August 1945 issue of Astounding Science Fiction and reprinted as "Escape!" Wikipedia

  • Science fiction short story by American writer Isaac Asimov. First published in the February 1944 issue of Astounding Science Fiction and reprinted in the collections I, Robot and The Complete Robot (1982). Wikipedia

  • Science fiction short story by American writer Isaac Asimov. First published in the March 1947 issue of Astounding Science Fiction and reprinted in the collections I, Robot , The Complete Robot (1982), Robot Dreams (1986), and Robot Visions (1990). Wikipedia

  • Science fiction short story by American writer Isaac Asimov, featuring his recurring characters Powell and Donovan. Written in October 1941 and first published in the March 1942 issue of Astounding Science Fiction. Wikipedia

    Sentences

    Sentences forLiar! (short story)

    • "Liar!", his third robot story, makes the first mention of the First Law but not the other two.Three Laws of Robotics-Wikipedia
    • In "Liar!", he asks the robot if Lanning is about to retire, and the robot says yes, and that Bogert is the obvious successor.List of Robot series characters-Wikipedia
    • According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the first passage in Asimov's short story "Liar!" (1941) that mentions the First Law is the earliest recorded use of the word robotics.Robot-Wikipedia
    • Asimov coined the term "robotics" in his 1941 story "Liar!", though he later remarked that he believed then that he was merely using an existing word, as he stated in Gold ("The Robot Chronicles").Isaac Asimov-Wikipedia
    • Giskard is telepathic, like the robot Herbie in the short story "Liar!", and tries to apply the Zeroth Law through his understanding of a more subtle concept of "harm" than most robots can grasp.Three Laws of Robotics-Wikipedia
    • Two short stories from the collection were made into episodes of Out of the Unknown: "The Prophet" (1967), based on "Reason"; and "Liar!" (1969).I, Robot-Wikipedia

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