Topics similar to or like Melody

Linear succession of musical tones that the listener perceives as a single entity. Wikipedia

  • Chord progression

    Succession of chords. Chord progressions are the foundation of harmony in Western musical tradition from the common practice era of Classical music to the 21st century. Wikipedia

  • Traditional sub-Saharan African harmony

    Music theory of harmony in Sub-Saharan Africa music based on the principles of homophonic parallelism , homophonic polyphony (independent parts moving together), counter melody (secondary melody) and ostinato-variation (variations based on a repeated theme). Common in African music and heterophony (the voices move at different times) is a common technique as well. Wikipedia

  • Imitation (music)

    Repetition of a melody in a polyphonic texture shortly after its first appearance in a different voice. The melody may vary through transposition, inversion, or otherwise, but retain its original character. Wikipedia

  • Transformation (music)

    In music, a transformation consists of any operation or process that may apply to a musical variable (usually a set or tone row in twelve tone music, or a melody or chord progression in tonal music), or rhythm in composition, performance, or analysis. Transformations include multiplication, rotation, permutation (i.e. transposition, inversion, and retrograde), prolation (augmentation, diminution) and combinations thereof. Wikipedia

  • Music and mathematics

    Music theory has no axiomatic foundation in modern mathematics, although some interesting work has recently been done in this direction (see the External Links), yet the basis of musical sound can be described mathematically (in acoustics) and exhibits "a remarkable array of number properties". Elements of music such as its form, rhythm and metre, the pitches of its notes and the tempo of its pulse can be related to the measurement of time and frequency, offering ready analogies in geometry. Wikipedia

  • Motif (music)

    Short musical phrase, a salient recurring figure, musical fragment or succession of notes that has some special importance in or is characteristic of a composition: "The motive is the smallest structural unit possessing thematic identity". The Encyclopédie de la Pléiade regards it as a "melodic, rhythmic, or harmonic cell", whereas the 1958 Encyclopédie Fasquelle maintains that it may contain one or more cells, though it remains the smallest analyzable element or phrase within a subject. Wikipedia

  • Musical notation

    Any system used to visually represent aurally perceived music played with instruments or sung by the human voice through the use of written, printed, or otherwise-produced symbols, including notation for durations of absence of sound such as rests. Fragmentary. Wikipedia

  • Subject (music)

    Material, usually a recognizable melody, upon which part or all of a composition is based. In forms other than the fugue, this may be known as the theme. Wikipedia

  • Level (music)

    Important melodic and harmonic progression where melodic material shifts between a whole tone above and a whole tone below the tonal center. This shift can occur to both neighboring notes, in either direction, and from any point of departure. Wikipedia

  • Steps and skips

    Difference in pitch between two consecutive notes of a musical scale. Interval between two consecutive scale degrees. Wikipedia

  • Figure (music)

    Shortest phrase in music; a short succession of notes, often recurring. It may have melodic pitch, harmonic progression, and rhythmic meter. Wikipedia

  • Figured bass

    Kind of musical notation in which numerals and symbols indicate intervals, chords, and non-chord tones that a musician playing piano, harpsichord, organ, lute (or other instruments capable of playing chords) play in relation to the bass note that these numbers and symbols appear above or below. Closely associated with basso continuo, a historically improvised accompaniment used in almost all genres of music in the Baroque period of Classical music (c. Wikipedia

  • Ostinato

    Ostinato is a motif or phrase that persistently repeats in the same musical voice, frequently in the same pitch. Well-known ostinato-based pieces include both classical compositions, such as Ravel's Boléro and the Carol of the Bells, and popular songs such as Donna Summer and Giorgio Moroder's "I Feel Love" (1977), Henry Mancini's theme from Peter Gunn (1959), and The Verve's "Bitter Sweet Symphony" (1997). Wikipedia

  • Orchestration

    Study or practice of writing music for an orchestra or of adapting music composed for another medium for an orchestra. Assignment of different instruments to play the different parts of a musical work. Wikipedia

  • Tonality

    Arrangement of pitches and/or chords of a musical work in a hierarchy of perceived relations, stabilities, attractions and directionality. Called the tonic. Wikipedia

  • Serialism

    Method of composition using series of pitches, rhythms, dynamics, timbres or other musical elements. Serialism began primarily with Arnold Schoenberg's twelve-tone technique, though some of his contemporaries were also working to establish serialism as a form of post-tonal thinking. Wikipedia

  • Harmonization

    Chordal accompaniment to a line or melody: "Using chords and melodies together, making harmony by stacking scale tones as triads". A harmonized scale can be created by using each note of a musical scale as a root note for a chord and then by taking other tones within the scale building the rest of a chord. Wikipedia

  • Key (music)

    Group of pitches, or scale, that forms the basis of a music composition in classical, Western art, and Western pop music. The group features a tonic note and its corresponding chords, also called a tonic or tonic chord, which provides a subjective sense of arrival and rest, and also has a unique relationship to the other pitches of the same group, their corresponding chords, and pitches and chords outside the group. Wikipedia

  • Music technology (mechanical)

    For electric music technologies, see Music technology; for electronic or digital music technologies, see Music technology Use of any device, mechanism, machine or tool by a musician or composer to make or perform music; to compose, notate, play back or record songs or pieces; or to analyze or edit music. Wikipedia

  • Glossary of music terminology

    List of musical terms that are likely to be encountered in printed scores, music reviews, and program notes. Most of the terms are Italian (see also Italian musical terms used in English), in accordance with the Italian origins of many European musical conventions. Wikipedia

  • Cadence

    In Western musical theory, a cadence (Latin cadentia, "a falling") is "a melodic or harmonic configuration that creates a sense of resolution [finality or pause]". Progression of two chords that concludes a phrase, section, or piece of music. Wikipedia

  • Major and minor

    Chord, scale, or key. Major or minor. Wikipedia

  • Music of Lithuania

    Music of Lithuania refers to all forms of music associated with Lithuania, which has a long history of the folk, popular and classical musical development. Important part of polytheistic, pre-Christian Lithuania – rituals were accompanied by music instruments and singing, deeds of the heroes and those who didn't return from the war were celebrated in songs. Wikipedia

  • Process music

    Music that arises from a process. It may make that process audible to the listener, or the process may be concealed. Wikipedia

  • Scale (music)

    Any set of musical notes ordered by fundamental frequency or pitch. Ascending scale, and a scale ordered by decreasing pitch is a descending scale. Wikipedia

  • Landini cadence

    Type of cadence, a technique in music composition, named after Francesco Landini (1325–1397), a blind Florentine organist, in honor of his extensive use of the technique. Used extensively in the 14th and early 15th century. Wikipedia

  • Cadenza

    Improvised or written-out ornamental passage played or sung by a soloist or soloists, usually in a "free" rhythmic style, and often allowing virtuosic display. During this time the accompaniment will rest, or sustain a note or chord. Wikipedia

  • Provided as an overview of and topical guide to music: Music – human expression in the medium of time using the structures of sounds or tones and silence. Wikipedia

  • Singing

    Act of producing musical sounds with the voice. Called a singer or vocalist . Wikipedia

  • Hauptstimme

    Main voice, chief part; i.e., the contrapuntal or melodic line of primary importance, in opposition to Nebenstimme. Secondary part; i.e., a secondary contrapuntal or melodic part, always occurring simultaneously with, and subsidiary to, the Hauptstimme. Wikipedia

Sentences

Sentences forMelody

  • Though he always insisted on the importance of time and "swing", Manne's concept of his own drumming style typically pointed to his melody-based approach.Shelly Manne-Wikipedia
  • For instance, melodic fragments of "Memory" are sung by Grizabella and Jemima at several points in the show before the song is sung in full, serving to characterise Grizabella and foreshadow her final number.Cats (musical)-Wikipedia
  • Music producer Rick Rubin wrote that "Right now, if you listen to pop, everything is in perfect pitch, perfect time and perfect tune. That's how ubiquitous Auto-Tune is."Auto-Tune-Wikipedia
  • Vocal pieces were in Latin—the language of church texts of the time—and typically were Church-polyphonic or "made up of several simultaneous melodies."Musician-Wikipedia
  • He was strongly influenced by Motown artists, in particular James Jamerson, whom McCartney called a hero for his melodic style.Paul McCartney-Wikipedia
  • He then considered elements of drama: plot (μύθος mythos), character (ἔθος ethos), thought (dianoia), diction (lexis), music (melodia), and spectacle (opsis).Playwright-Wikipedia

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