Former monarchies similar to or like Mughal emperors

The Mughal emperors (or Moghul) built and ruled the Mughal Empire on the Indian subcontinent, mainly corresponding to the modern countries of India, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Bangladesh. Wikipedia

  • Mughal Empire

    Early modern empire in South Asia. For some two centuries, the empire stretched from the outer fringes of the Indus basin in the west, northern Afghanistan in the northwest, and Kashmir in the north, to the highlands of present-day Assam and Bangladesh in the east, and the uplands of the Deccan plateau in south India. Wikipedia

  • Muslim conquests in the Indian subcontinent

    Muslim conquests in the Indian subcontinent mainly took place from the 12th to the 16th centuries, though earlier Muslim conquests include the invasions into modern Pakistan and the Umayyad campaigns in India, during the time of the Rajput kingdoms in the 8th century. Ideological link to the suzerainty of the Abbasid Caliphate, invaded and plundered vast parts of Punjab and Gujarat, starting from the Indus River, during the 10th century. Wikipedia

  • Timeline of Indian history, comprising important legal and territorial changes and political events in India and its predecessor states. To read about the background to these events, see History of India. Wikipedia

  • Mughal architecture

    Type of Indo-Islamic architecture developed by the Mughals in the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries throughout the ever-changing extent of their empire in the Indian subcontinent. Amalgam of Islamic, Persian, Turkic and Indian architecture. Wikipedia

  • History of India

    About the pre-1947 history of the Indian subcontinent. For post-1947 history, see History of India (1947–present) Wikipedia

  • Aurangzeb

    The sixth Mughal emperor, who ruled over almost the entire Indian subcontinent for a period of 49 years. Among the few monarchs to have fully established Sharia law and Islamic economics throughout the Indian subcontinent. Wikipedia

  • Babur

    The founder of the Mughal Empire and first Emperor of the Mughal dynasty ((r. 1526 – 1530)) in the Indian subcontinent. Wikipedia

  • Bengal Subah

    Subdivision of the Mughal Empire encompassing much of the Bengal region, which includes modern Bangladesh and the Indian state of West Bengal, between the 16th and 18th centuries. Established following the dissolution of the Bengal Sultanate, a major trading nation in the world, when the region was absorbed into one of the gunpowder empires. Wikipedia

  • Mughal gardens

    Mughal gardens are a type of gardens built by the Mughals. Influenced by the Persian gardens particularly the Charbagh structure, which is intended to create a representation of an earthly utopia in which humans co-exist in perfect harmony with all elements of nature. Wikipedia

  • Mughal-Sikh Wars

    The Mughal-Sikh Wars were a series of campaigns between Mughal and Sikh armies, taking place in present-day Pakistan and the India between the 16th and 18th centuries. Between the 7th and 11th centuries, Islamic armies conducted several campaigns into the Hindu-dominated Indian subcontinent, making conquests limited to present-day Pakistan and the Punjab. Wikipedia

  • Punjab

    Geopolitical, cultural, and historical region in South Asia, specifically in the northern part of the Indian subcontinent, comprising areas of eastern Pakistan and northern India. The boundaries of the region are ill-defined and focus on historical accounts. Wikipedia

  • Humayun

    The second emperor of the Mughal Empire, who ruled over territory in what is now Afghanistan, Pakistan, Northern India, and Bangladesh from 1530 to 1540 and again from 1555 to 1556. Like his father, Babur, he lost his kingdom early but regained it with the aid of the Safavid dynasty of Persia, with additional territory. Wikipedia

  • India–Mongolia relations

    India-Mongolia relations (भारत-मंगोलिया संबंध; Энэтхэг, Монголын харилцаа), also knows as Indian-Mongolian relations or Indo-Mongolian relations, refers to bilateral relations between India and Mongolia. These relations are rapidly developing, with Indo-Mongolian cooperation formerly limited to diplomatic visits, provision of soft loans and financial aid and the collaborations in the IT sector, but enhanced in recent years by Narendra Modi's 2015 visit to Ulaanbaatar, where the two Prime Ministers declared a "strategic partnership" between the two Asian democracies. Wikipedia

  • This list includes the biological mothers of Mughal Emperors. There were nineteen emperors of the Mughal Empire in thirteen generations. Wikipedia

  • Muslim South Asia

    Muslim rule in the Indian subcontinent began in the course of a gradual Muslim conquest in the Indian subcontinent, beginning mainly after the conquest of Sindh and Multan led by Muhammad bin Qasim. Generally credited with laying the foundation of Muslim rule in Northern India. Wikipedia

  • Lahore Fort

    Citadel in the city of Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan. Located at the northern end of walled city Lahore, and spreads over an area greater than 20 hectares. Wikipedia

  • Saharanpur district

    Northernmost of the districts of Uttar Pradesh state, India. Bordering the states of Haryana, Himachal Pradesh and Uttarakhand, and close to the foothills of Shivalik range, it lies in the northern part of the Doab region. Wikipedia

  • Akbar

    The third Mughal emperor, who reigned from 1556 to 1605. Akbar succeeded his father, Humayun, under a regent, Bairam Khan, who helped the young emperor expand and consolidate Mughal domains in India. Wikipedia

  • Military history of India

    The predecessors to the contemporary Army of India were many: the sepoy regiments, native cavalry, irregular horse and Indian sapper and miner companies raised by the three British presidencies. Raised under the British Raj in the 19th century by taking the erstwhile presidency armies, merging them, and bringing them under the Crown. Wikipedia

  • Persian language chronicle written by Sujan Rai in the Mughal Empire of present-day India. It deals with the history of Hindustan (northern Indian subcontinent), and also contains details about the contemporary Mughal Empire. Wikipedia

  • Sikh Empire

    State originating in the Indian subcontinent, formed under the leadership of Maharaja Ranjit Singh, who established an empire based in the Punjab. Forged on the foundations of the Khalsa from a collection of autonomous Sikh misls. Wikipedia

  • Muslim conquests of Afghanistan

    The Muslim conquests of Afghanistan began during the Muslim conquest of Persia as the Arab Muslims migrated eastwards to Khorasan, Sistan and Transoxiana. 15 years after the Battle of Nahāvand, they controlled all Sasanian domains except southern and eastern Afghanistan. Wikipedia

  • Nur Jahan

    The twentieth (and last) wife of the Mughal emperor Jahangir. Born Mehr-un-Nissa, the daughter of a Grand Vizier who served under Akbar. Wikipedia

  • Maratha rulers

    The Hindu rulers , belonging to the Bhonsale dynasty, from the early 17th century to the early 18th century, built and ruled the Hindvi Empire on the Indian subcontinent, mainly corresponding to the modern countries of Bangladesh, India and Pakistan. Deposed in 1818, with the establishment of the British Raj. Wikipedia

  • History of Punjab

    The History of the Punjab refers to the history of the Punjab region, a geopolitical, cultural, and historical region in South Asia, comprising areas of eastern Pakistan and northern India. The primary geographical extent of the Indus Valley Civilisation, which was notable for advanced technologies and amenities that the people of the region had used. Wikipedia

  • Padshah Begum

    Superlative imperial title conferred upon the 'imperial' or 'First Lady' of the Mughal Empire and was considered to be the most important title in the Mughal harem or zenana. This title can be equivalent with "empress" in English, but in only approximate terms in the Mughal context. Wikipedia

  • The term for a province in the Mughal Empire. Derived from Arabic and Persian. Wikipedia

  • Company rule in India

    Company rule in India (sometimes, Company Raj, "raj," lit. "rule" in Hindi ) refers to the rule or dominion of the British East India Company on the Indian subcontinent. Variously taken to have commenced in 1757, after the Battle of Plassey, when the Nawab of Bengal surrendered his dominions to the Company, in 1765, when the Company was granted the diwani, or the right to collect revenue, in Bengal and Bihar, or in 1773, when the Company established a capital in Calcutta, appointed its first Governor-General, Warren Hastings, and became directly involved in governance. Wikipedia

  • Mughal painting

    Particular style of South Asian, particularly North Indian , painting confined to miniatures either as book illustrations or as single works to be kept in albums (muraqqa). It emerged from Persian miniature painting (itself partly of Chinese origin) and developed in the court of the Mughal Empire of the 16th to 18th centuries. Wikipedia

Sentences

Sentences forMughal emperors

  • Babur (14 February 1483 – 26 December 1530), born Zahīr ud-Dīn Muhammad, was the founder of the Mughal Empire and first Emperor of the Mughal dynasty ((r.Babur-Wikipedia
  • In the west, the term "Mughal" was used for the emperor, and by extension, the empire as a whole.Mughal Empire-Wikipedia
  • Abu'l-Fath Jalal-ud-din Muhammad Akbar (Persian: ; October 1542– 27 October 1605), popularly known as Akbar the Great, (Akbar-i-azam ), and also as Akbar I, was the third Mughal emperor, who reigned from 1556 to 1605.Akbar-Wikipedia
  • The victory was consolidated in 1764 at the Battle of Buxar, when the East India Company army defeated Mughal Emperor Shah Alam II.Indian Rebellion of 1857-Wikipedia
  • The Mughal emperor Shah Jahan built an irrigation canal on the Yamuna River in the early 17th century.Ganges-Wikipedia
  • The Mughal Emperor Akbar's reign (1556–1586) saw the first translations of the Upanishads into Persian.Upanishads-Wikipedia

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