Musical artists similar to or like Pete Seeger

American folk singer and social activist. Wikipedia

  • American folk music revival

    The American folk music revival began during the 1940s and peaked in popularity in the mid-1960s. Its roots went earlier, and performers like Josh White, Burl Ives, Woody Guthrie, Lead Belly, Big Bill Broonzy, Billie Holiday, Richard Dyer-Bennet, Oscar Brand, Jean Ritchie, John Jacob Niles, Susan Reed, Paul Robeson, Bessie Smith, Ma Rainey and Cisco Houston had enjoyed a limited general popularity in the 1930s and 1940s. Wikipedia

  • Joan Baez

    American singer, songwriter, musician, and activist. Her contemporary folk music often includes songs of protest and social justice. Wikipedia

  • Phil Ochs

    American protest singer (or, as he preferred, a topical singer) and songwriter who was known for his sharp wit, sardonic humor, political activism, often alliterative lyrics, and distinctive voice. He wrote hundreds of songs in the 1960s and 1970s and released eight albums. Wikipedia

  • Contemporary folk music

    Contemporary folk music refers to a wide variety of genres that emerged in the mid 20th century and afterwards which were associated with traditional folk music. Starting in the mid-20th century a new form of popular folk music evolved from traditional folk music. Wikipedia

  • Protest songs in the United States

    Long one that dates back to the 18th century and colonial period, the American Revolutionary War and its aftermath. In the 19th century, topical subjects for protest in song included abolition, slavery, poverty, and the Civil War among other subjects. Wikipedia

  • Bob Dylan

    American singer-songwriter, author and visual artist. Widely regarded as one of the greatest songwriters, Dylan has been a major figure in popular culture for more than 50 years. Wikipedia

  • Ronnie Gilbert

    American folk singer, songwriter, actress and political activist. One of the original members of the music quartet the Weavers, as a contralto with Pete Seeger, Lee Hays, and Fred Hellerman. Wikipedia

  • Woody Guthrie

    American singer-songwriter, who is considered to be one of the most significant figures in American folk music. His music, including songs such as "This Land Is Your Land", has inspired several generations both politically and musically. Wikipedia

  • Canadian-born American folk singer-songwriter and author. In his career, spanning 70 years, he composed at least 300 songs and released nearly 100 albums, among them Canadian and American patriotic songs. Wikipedia

  • Tom Paxton

    American folk singer-songwriter who has had a music career spanning more than fifty years. In 2009, Paxton received a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. Wikipedia

  • American folk singer, guitarist, producer, and songwriter. Original member of the seminal American folk group The Weavers, together with Pete Seeger, Lee Hays, and Ronnie Gilbert. Wikipedia

  • American folk music quartet based out of the Greenwich Village area in New York City. They sang traditional folk songs from around the world, as well as blues, gospel music, children's songs, labor songs, and American ballads, and sold millions of records at the height of their popularity. Wikipedia

  • List of folk musicians. Greek Islands' songs (Νησιώτικα): Wikipedia

  • American folk-singer and songwriter, best known for singing bass with The Weavers. Concerned with overcoming racism, inequality, and violence in society. Wikipedia

  • American folk singer-songwriter, magazine editor, Shakespearean actor, political activist, and for a time, a lay Baptist preacher. Prominent figure in the Greenwich Village scene of the early 1960s, where he was master of ceremonies at New York City's leading folk music venue, Gerde's Folk City, as well as co-editor of the protest song magazine Broadside. Wikipedia

  • Holly Near

    American singer-songwriter, actress, teacher, and activist. Born in Ukiah, California, in 1949 and was Wikipedia

  • Jean Ritchie

    American folk singer, songwriter, and Appalachian dulcimer player, called by some the "Mother of Folk". In her youth she learned hundreds of folk songs in the traditional way (orally, from her family and community), many of which were Appalachian variants of centuries old British and Irish songs, including dozens of Child Ballads. Wikipedia

  • Arlo Guthrie

    Retired American folk singer-songwriter. Known for singing songs of protest against social injustice, and storytelling while performing songs, following the tradition of his father Woody Guthrie. Wikipedia

  • The Kingston Trio

    American folk and pop music group that helped launch the folk revival of the late 1950s to late 1960s. Original lineup of Dave Guard, Bob Shane, and Nick Reynolds. Wikipedia

  • Odetta

    American singer, actress, guitarist, lyricist, and a civil and human rights activist, often referred to as "The Voice of the Civil Rights Movement". Her musical repertoire consisted largely of American folk music, blues, jazz, and spirituals. Wikipedia

  • American folk music

    The term American folk music encompasses numerous music genres, variously known as traditional music, traditional folk music, contemporary folk music, or roots music. Many traditional songs have been sung within the same family or folk group for generations, and sometimes trace back to such origins as Great Britain, Europe, or Africa. Wikipedia

  • Guy Carawan

    American folk musician and musicologist. He served as music director and song leader for the Highlander Research and Education Center in New Market, Tennessee. Wikipedia

  • Newport Folk Festival

    American annual folk-oriented music festival in Newport, Rhode Island, which began in July 1959 as a counterpart to the previously established Newport Jazz Festival. Often considered one of the first modern music festivals in America and remains a focal point in the ever-expanding genre of "folk" music. Wikipedia

  • Folk rock

    Hybrid music genre combining elements of folk music and rock music, which arose in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom in the mid-1960s. In the U.S., folk rock emerged from the folk music revival and the influence that the Beatles and other British Invasion bands had on members of that movement. Wikipedia

  • Frank Hamilton (musician)

    American folk musician, collector of folk songs, and educator. He co-founded the Old Town School of Folk Music in Chicago, Illinois. Wikipedia

  • Josh White

    American singer, guitarist, songwriter, actor and civil rights activist. He also recorded under the names Pinewood Tom and Tippy Barton in the 1930s. Wikipedia

  • Peter Yarrow

    American singer and songwriter who found fame with the 1960s folk music trio Peter, Paul and Mary. Yarrow co-wrote (with Leonard Lipton) one of the group's greatest hits, "Puff, the Magic Dragon". Wikipedia

  • Harry Belafonte

    American singer, songwriter, activist, and actor. Dubbed the "King of Calypso" for popularizing the Trinidadian Caribbean musical style with an international audience in the 1950s. Wikipedia

  • Singer-songwriter

    Singer-songwriters are musicians who write, compose, and perform their own musical material, including lyrics and melodies. Built on the folk-acoustic tradition, although this role has transmuted through different eras of popular music. Wikipedia

  • American music manager. He died in 2005 at the age of 86. Wikipedia

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