Nascar drivers similar to or like Ron Fellows

Accomplished Canadian SCCA Trans-Am, IMSA, and American Le Mans Series driver. Wikipedia

  • Boris Said

    American professional race car driver. He has competed in a variety of disciplines including sports cars, stock cars, and touring cars. Wikipedia

  • Robby Gordon

    American auto racing driver. He has raced in NASCAR, CART, IndyCar, Trans-Am, IMSA, IROC and Dakar Rally. Wikipedia

  • Mike Wallace (racing driver)

    American professional stock car racing driver. He last competed part-time in the NASCAR Xfinity Series, driving the No. 0 Chevrolet Camaro for JD Motorsports. Wikipedia

  • Jamie McMurray

    American former professional stock car racing driver and currently an analyst for Fox NASCAR. He raced in the NASCAR Cup Series on a full-time basis from 2003 to 2018 before shifting to a Daytona 500-only schedule in 2019 and 2021. Wikipedia

  • Tony Stewart

    American semi-retired professional stock car racing driver and current NASCAR team owner. Three-time NASCAR Cup Series champion as a driver, winning titles in 2002, 2005 and 2011. Wikipedia

  • Joe Nemechek

    American professional stock car racing driver who competes part-time in the NASCAR Xfinity Series, driving a Chevrolet Camaro for Mike Harmon Racing, as well as part-time in the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series, driving the Nos. 8 and 87 Chevrolet Silverados for his own team, NEMCO Motorsports. Wikipedia

  • Max Papis

    Italian professional motorsport driver who has competed in several top-level motorsports events such as Le Mans 24 Hours, Formula One and Champ Car. He has three Champ Car victories. Wikipedia

  • Scott Pruett

    Former American race car driver who has competed in NASCAR, CART, IMSA, Trans-Am and Grand-Am. He and his wife Judy have three children and are children's book authors. Wikipedia

  • Morgan Shepherd

    American semi-retired professional stock car racing driver and current team owner. He last competed part-time in the NASCAR Xfinity Series, driving the No. 89 Chevrolet Camaro for Shepherd Racing Ventures. Wikipedia

  • Jimmie Johnson

    American professional auto racing driver who competes in the IndyCar Series, driving the No. 48 Honda on a part-time schedule for Chip Ganassi Racing. A seven-time NASCAR Cup Series champion, he competed full-time in the series from 2002 to 2020, driving the No. 48 Chevrolet with Hendrick Motorsports, before transitioning to open-wheel racing. Wikipedia

  • Michael Waltrip

    American former professional stock car racing driver, racing commentator, and published author. Younger brother of three-time NASCAR champion and racing commentator Darrell Waltrip. Wikipedia

  • Brendan Gaughan

    American former professional stock car racing driver, having raced in NASCAR's three national series. Grandson of Vegas gaming pioneer Jackie Gaughan and son of Michael Gaughan, a hotel and casino magnate. Wikipedia

  • Elliott Sadler

    American former professional stock car racing driver. He last competed part-time in the NASCAR Xfinity Series, driving the No. 10 Chevrolet Camaro for Kaulig Racing. Wikipedia

  • A. J. Allmendinger

    American professional racing driver and television commentator, working as an analyst for IMSA on NBC and NASCAR America. He also competes in the NASCAR Xfinity and Cup Series for Kaulig Racing, driving the No. 16 Chevrolet Camaro on a full-time basis in the former and part-time in the latter. Wikipedia

  • Mike Bliss

    American professional stock car racing driver. A journeyman NASCAR competitor and the 2002 NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series champion, he has run in all three national series. Wikipedia

  • Sam Hornish Jr.

    American semi-retired professional auto racing driver. He last competed part-time in the NASCAR Xfinity Series, driving the No. 22 Ford Mustang for Team Penske in 2017. Wikipedia

  • Stanton Barrett

    American professional stock car racing driver and Hollywood stuntman. The son of former stuntman Stan Barrett, he began NASCAR racing in the early 1990s, starting with the Busch (now Xfinity) Series in 1992. Wikipedia

  • Canadian stock car racer and a former competitor in the NASCAR Winston Cup Series, Busch Series and Craftsman Truck Series. Currently team owner of MacDonald Motorsports, which competes in the Nationwide Series. Wikipedia

  • Dale Earnhardt Jr.

    American semi-retired professional stock car racing driver, team owner, author, and an analyst for NASCAR on NBC. He competes part-time in the NASCAR Xfinity Series, driving the No. 8 Chevrolet Camaro for his team JR Motorsports. Wikipedia

  • Kevin Harvick

    American professional racing driver. A veteran of stock car racing, he competes full-time in the NASCAR Cup Series, driving the No. 4 Ford Mustang for Stewart-Haas Racing. Wikipedia

  • Justin Marks

    American entrepreneur and former professional racing driver. He last competed in the WeatherTech SportsCar Championship, driving the No. 93 for Meyer Shank Racing with Curb-Agajanian in the GT Daytona class. Wikipedia

  • Kurt Busch

    American professional auto racing driver. He competes full-time in the NASCAR Cup Series, driving the No. 1 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 1LE for Chip Ganassi Racing. Wikipedia

  • Danica Patrick

    American former professional racing driver. Most successful woman in the history of American open-wheel racing—her victory in the 2008 Indy Japan 300 is the only win by a woman in an IndyCar Series race. Wikipedia

  • Ron Hornaday Jr.

    American former professional stock car racing driver. Father of former NASCAR driver Ronnie Hornaday and son of the late Ron Hornaday Sr., a two-time Winston West Champion. Wikipedia

  • Brad Teague

    Retired American professional stock car racing driver. Veteran of the NASCAR Winston Cup Series, Nationwide Series, and Camping World Truck Series. Wikipedia

  • Kyle Busch

    American professional stock car racing driver and team owner. , he competes full-time in the NASCAR Cup Series, driving the No. 18 Toyota Camry for Joe Gibbs Racing, part-time in the NASCAR Xfinity Series, driving the No. 54 Toyota Supra for JGR, and part-time in the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series, driving the No. 51 Toyota Tundra for Kyle Busch Motorsports. Wikipedia

  • Tony Raines

    Retired American professional stock car racing driver. Former National Touring Series champion in the now defunct American Speed Association and 1999 Rookie of the Year in the NASCAR Nationwide Series. Wikipedia

  • Mark Martin

    Retired American stock car racing driver. Now the Xfinity Series with 49. Wikipedia

  • Matt Kenseth

    American former professional stock car racing driver. He last competed full-time in the NASCAR Cup Series, driving the No. 42 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 1LE for Chip Ganassi Racing. Wikipedia

Sentences

Sentences forRon Fellows

  • Canadian Motorsports Ventures Ltd. (CMV) which includes Orlando Corp. Chairman Carlo Fidani and Canadian road racing driver Ron Fellows, purchased the facility in June 2011.Canadian Tire Motorsport Park-Wikipedia
  • When Sadler was running behind Smith a few laps later, Sadler retaliated, sending Smith into a crash collecting Ron Fellows.Elliott Sadler-Wikipedia
  • This was the first time a non-American driver has finished in the top five of a truck series event since Canadian Ron Fellows won on the Watkins Glen road course on 26 June 1999.Marcos Ambrose-Wikipedia
  • Blaney also attempted the Watkins Glen race in the No. 35 while road course veteran Ron Fellows drove the No. 36.Tommy Baldwin Racing-Wikipedia
  • He ultimately relented and ran the race, dominating and holding off Canadian road ringer Ron Fellows for the win.Tony Stewart-Wikipedia
  • Pruett was running 11th on the final lap but got spun out by fellow road racer Ron Fellows, throwing both of them into the final-turn gravel trap.Scott Pruett-Wikipedia

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