Graphic novels similar to or like Watchmen

Comic book maxiseries by the British creative team of writer Alan Moore, artist Dave Gibbons and colorist John Higgins. Wikipedia

  • DC Universe: The Stories of Alan Moore

    2006 trade paperback collection of comic books written by Alan Moore for DC Comics from 1985 to 1988, published by Titan Books. Replacement for the earlier Across the Universe: The Stories of Alan Moore which contained all of the same stories except for "Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?" Wikipedia

  • V for Vendetta

    British graphic novel written by Alan Moore and illustrated by David Lloyd . Ongoing serial in the short-lived UK anthology Warrior, it morphed into a ten-issue limited series published by DC Comics. Wikipedia

  • A God Somewhere

    2010 graphic novel created by writer John Arcudi, artist Peter Snejbjerg, and colorist Bjarne Hansen. First published in one paperback volume by DC Comics' Wildstorm imprint. Wikipedia

  • From Hell

    Graphic novel by writer Alan Moore and artist Eddie Campbell, originally published in serial form from 1989 to 1998. Published in 1999 by Top Shelf Productions. Wikipedia

  • Going Home (comics)

    Ninth novel in Canadian cartoonist Dave Sim's Cerebus comic book series. Made up of issues #232–265 of Cerebus. Wikipedia

  • Church and State (comics)

    Third novel in Canadian cartoonist Dave Sim's Cerebus comic book series. In it, Cerebus once again becomes Prime Minister, and eventually Pope. Wikipedia

  • Joker (graphic novel)

    American graphic novel published by DC Comics in 2008. Based on characters from DC's Batman series, focusing primarily on the title character. Wikipedia

  • High Society (comics)

    Second collected volume, and first volume-length story, of Canadian cartoonist Dave Sim's Cerebus comic book series. It focuses mainly on politics, including Cerebus' campaign for the office of Prime Minister, in the fictional city-state of Iest in Sim's world of Estarcion. Wikipedia

  • Guys (comics)

    Seventh novel in Canadian cartoonist Dave Sim's Cerebus comic book series. Made up of issues #201-219 of Cerebus and was collected as Guys in one volume in September 1997. Wikipedia

  • The Book of Genesis (comics)

    Comic book illustrated by American cartoonist and comic book artist Robert Crumb that purports to be a faithful, literal illustration of the Book of Genesis. It reached #1 the New York Times graphic novel bestseller list and on the Christian books list at Amazon.com. Wikipedia

  • Heroes of the Equinox

    Volume eight in the French comic book science fiction series Valérian and Laureline created by writer Pierre Christin and artist Jean-Claude Mézières. One of four representatives from different races dispatched to the planet Simlane. Wikipedia

  • First collected volume of Canadian cartoonist Dave Sim's Cerebus comic book series. Made up of the first 25 issues of Cerebus, plus, as of the 11th edition, some strips that ran in Comics Buyer's Guide featuring Silverspoon, a parody of the comic strip Prince Valiant. Wikipedia

  • A Small Killing

    Graphic novel by Alan Moore, published in 1991. Illustrated by Oscar Zárate. Wikipedia

  • Latter Days (comics)

    Tenth and final novel in Canadian cartoonist Dave Sim's Cerebus comic book series. Made up of issues #266-300 of Cerebus. Wikipedia

  • The Ghosts of Inverloch

    Volume eleven in the French comic book (or bande dessinée) science fiction series Valérian and Laureline created by writer Pierre Christin and artist Jean-Claude Mézières. Inverloch Castle, Northern Scotland, 1986: Laureline, a guest at the castle, goes on her morning ride across Kenchmoor with her host, Lady Seal. Wikipedia

  • Mothers and Daughters (comics)

    Sixth novel in Canadian cartoonist Dave Sim's Cerebus comic book series. Sim considers the novel to be the final portion of the main story. Wikipedia

  • The Living Weapons

    Volume fourteen in the French comic book science fiction series Valérian and Laureline created by writer Pierre Christin and artist Jean-Claude Mézières. Valérian, a spatio-temporal agent from Galaxity, future capital of Earth, in the 28th century. Wikipedia

  • The ninth comic book in the Blake and Mortimer series. It appeared in book format in 1962. Wikipedia

  • Elmer (comics)

    Filipino comic book created, written, and illustrated by Gerry Alanguilan. Originally self-published as a four-issue miniseries under a Komikero Publishing imprint between 2006 and 2008 before being collected in a trade paperback in 2009. Wikipedia

  • Batman/Judge Dredd: Judgment on Gotham

    First of four Batman and Judge Dredd crossover comic books, published by DC Comics and Fleetway in 1991. Written by John Wagner and Alan Grant, with art by Simon Bisley. Wikipedia

  • De cape et de crocs

    French comic book swashbuckling series, created by writer Alain Ayroles and artist Jean-Luc Masbou. Notable for its many references to classical culture and occasional nods to modern references. Wikipedia

  • All His Engines

    Original graphic novel featuring the DC Comics character John Constantine, written by Mike Carey, with art by Leonardo Manco. Spin-off of the long-running series Hellblazer, published by the DC Comics imprint Vertigo. Wikipedia

  • Birds of the Master

    Volume five in the French comic book science fiction series Valérian and Laureline created by writer Pierre Christin and artist Jean-Claude Mézières. Unknown asteroid. Wikipedia

  • The Circles of Power

    Volume fifteen in the French comic book science fiction series Valérian and Laureline created by writer Pierre Christin and artist Jean-Claude Mézières. Valérian and Laureline have brought their crippled astroship to a repair yard on the planet Rubanis. Wikipedia

  • Batman: Son of the Demon

    1987 graphic novel by writer Mike W. Barr and artist Jerry Bingham, published by DC Comics. Released in both hardcover and softcover formats. Wikipedia

  • On the Frontiers

    Volume thirteen in the French comic book science fiction series Valérian and Laureline created by writer Pierre Christin and artist Jean-Claude Mézières. Delighted to discover a fellow member of her race, the Wûûrm, called Jal is also travelling on the liner. Wikipedia

  • Welcome to Alflolol

    Volume four in the French comic book science fiction series Valérian and Laureline created by writer Pierre Christin and artist Jean-Claude Mézières. Valérian and Laureline are departing the Earth colony Technorog following a tour of inspection. Wikipedia

  • On the False Earths

    Volume seven in the French comic book science fiction series Valérian and Laureline created by writer Pierre Christin and artist Jean-Claude Mézières. India, the nineteenth century. Wikipedia

  • Empire of a Thousand Planets

    Volume two in the French comic book science fiction series Valérian and Laureline created by writer Pierre Christin and artist Jean-Claude Mézières. Potential threat to Galaxity, the capital of Earth in the 28th century. Wikipedia

Sentences

Sentences forWatchmen

  • In the "Watchmen" sequel "Doomsday Clock," Doctor Poison attended the meeting established by the Riddler and mentioned a rumor that Wonder Woman was forcefully dragged back to Themyscira by her fellow Amazons.Wonder Woman-Wikipedia
  • The graphic novel Watchmen is set in an alternative history, in 1985 where superheroes exist, the Vietnam War was won by the United States, and Richard Nixon is in his fifth term as President of the United States.Parallel universes in fiction-Wikipedia
  • Two DC limited series, Batman: The Dark Knight Returns by Frank Miller and Watchmen by Moore and artist Dave Gibbons, drew attention in the mainstream press for their dark psychological complexity and promotion of the antihero.DC Comics-Wikipedia
  • In the original Watchmen comic book that the show is a sequel to, Redford is mentioned as a contender for the 1988 election against Richard Nixon (who also continued his presidency beyond the two terms).Robert Redford-Wikipedia
  • The company has published non-DC Universe-related material, including Watchmen, V for Vendetta, and many titles under their alternative imprint Vertigo.DC Comics-Wikipedia
  • In general, DC Comics has led a parody of its own teams and organizations after the Watchmen storyline and the Batman run from a dark humor style which began during the 1980s and ended in the early 90s.DC Universe-Wikipedia
  • In the mid-to-late 1980s, two series published by DC Comics, Batman: The Dark Knight Returns and Watchmen, had a profound impact upon the American comic-book industry.American comic book-Wikipedia
  • On October 18, 2011, Amazon.com announced a partnership with DC Comics for the exclusive digital rights to many popular comics, including Superman, Batman, Green Lantern, The Sandman, and Watchmen.Amazon (company)-Wikipedia
  • The limited series Watchmen, begun in 1986 and collected as a trade paperback in 1987, cemented Moore's reputation.Alan Moore-Wikipedia
  • The term became widely known with the public after the commercial success of Maus, Watchmen, and The Dark Knight Returns in the mid-1980s.Comics-Wikipedia
  • Gibbons also noted that Mad was an overt influence on Watchmen, the acclaimed 12-issue comic book series created by writer Alan Moore and himself:Mad (magazine)-Wikipedia
  • Examples include Marvel Comics' Secret War and DC Comics' Watchmen among many others.Paperback-Wikipedia
  • Although some minor secondary characters in DC Comics' mature-audience 1980s miniseries Watchmen were gay, and the reformed supervillain Pied Piper came out to Wally West in an issue of The Flash in 1991, Northstar is considered to be the first openly gay superhero appearing in mainstream comic books.Superhero-Wikipedia
  • Alan Moore (born 18 November 1953) is an English writer known primarily for his work in comic books including Watchmen, V for Vendetta, The Ballad of Halo Jones, Swamp Thing, Batman: The Killing Joke and From Hell.Alan Moore-Wikipedia
  • 2 in 1985 with John Totleben and Steve Bissette, for Best Continuing Series for Swamp Thing in 1985, 1986 and 1987 with Totleben and Bissette, Best Writer for Swamp Thing in 1985 and 1986 and for Watchmen in 1987, and with Dave Gibbons for Best Finite Series and Best Writer/Artist (Single or Team) for Watchmen in 1987.Alan Moore-Wikipedia
  • *1988 With Dave Gibbons, Watchmen (DC)Alan Moore-Wikipedia
  • The webcomic PvP ran a story arc starting at the beginning of March 2009 parodying the comic series and movie Watchmen called The Ombudsmen.Ombudsman-Wikipedia
  • Writers included Alan Moore, famous for his V for Vendetta, From Hell, Watchmen, Marvelman, and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen; Neil Gaiman with The Sandman mythos and Books of Magic; Warren Ellis, creator of Transmetropolitan and Planetary; and others such as Mark Millar, creator of Wanted and Kick-Ass.Comic book-Wikipedia
  • In the 2017–2018 Watchmen sequel Doomsday Clock, Ozymandias goes to LexCorp to enlist Lex Luthor to help him locate Doctor Manhattan.Lex Luthor-Wikipedia
  • It was recorded to feature as the end credit track for the 2009 film Watchmen, an adaptation of the graphic novel of the same name.My Chemical Romance-Wikipedia
  • Released the same year as Alan Moore's and Dave Gibbons' DC miniseries Watchmen, it showcased a new form of more adult-oriented storytelling to both comics fans and a crossover mainstream audience.Frank Miller (comics)-Wikipedia
  • Some acid house fans used a smiley face with a blood streak on it, which Watchmen comics creator Alan Moore asserts was based on Dave Gibbons' artwork for the series.Acid house-Wikipedia
  • Gilliam attempted twice to adapt Alan Moore's Watchmen comics into a film, in 1989 and 1996.Terry Gilliam-Wikipedia
  • In 2019, he appears as another DC Comics character, Ozymandias, in HBO's Watchmen, based on the graphic novel series of the same name.Jeremy Irons-Wikipedia
  • The mad scientist then straps the re-animated Robot Chicken into a chair, uses calipers to hold his eyes open, and forces him to watch a bank of television monitors (with allusions to A Clockwork Orange and Watchmen); this scene segues into the body of the show, which resembles someone frequently changing TV channels.Robot Chicken-Wikipedia
  • Dave Gibbons, artist of Watchmen, was impressed by his work and started working with him in Kingsman, published by Marvel at the Icon Comics imprint, which allowed Millar to retain the rights.Ultimate Marvel-Wikipedia
  • Two DC Comics book reprints of self-contained miniseries did likewise, though they were not originally published as graphic novels: Batman: The Dark Knight Returns (1986), a collection of Frank Miller's four-part comic-book series featuring an older Batman faced with the problems of a dystopian future; and Watchmen (1986-1987), a collection of Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons' 12-issue limited series in which Moore notes he "set out to explore, amongst other things, the dynamics of power in a post-Hiroshima world".Graphic novel-Wikipedia
  • The term gained popularity in the comics community after the publication of Will Eisner's A Contract with God (1978) and the start of Marvel's Graphic Novel line (1982) and became familiar to the public in the late 1980s after the commercial successes of the first volume of Art Spiegelman's Maus in 1986 and the collected editions of Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns in 1986 and Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons' Watchmen in 1987.Graphic novel-Wikipedia
  • He was subsequently picked up by the American DC Comics, and as "the first comics writer living in Britain to do prominent work in America", he worked on major characters such as Batman (Batman: The Killing Joke) and Superman (Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?), substantially developed the character Swamp Thing, and penned original titles such as Watchmen.Alan Moore-Wikipedia
  • The life of Ramesses II has inspired many fictional representations, including the historical novels of the French writer Christian Jacq, the Ramsès series; the graphic novel Watchmen, in which the character of Adrian Veidt uses Ramesses II to form part of the inspiration for his alter-ego, Ozymandias; Norman Mailer's novel Ancient Evenings, which is largely concerned with the life of Ramesses II, though from the perspective of Egyptians living during the reign of Ramesses IX; and the Anne Rice book The Mummy, or Ramses the Damned (1989), in which Ramesses was the main character.Ramesses II-Wikipedia

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