Political parties similar to or like Whig Party (United States)

Political party active in the middle of the 19th century in the United States. Wikipedia

  • History of the United States Whig Party

    The history of the United States Whig Party lasted from the establishment of the Whig Party early in President Andrew Jackson's second term (1833–1837) to the collapse of the party during the term of President Franklin Pierce (1853–1857). The Whigs emerged in the 1830s in opposition to President Andrew Jackson, pulling together former members of the National Republican Party, the Anti-Masonic Party, and disaffected Democrats. Wikipedia

  • United States presidential election

    Indirect election in which citizens of the United States who are registered to vote in one of the fifty U.S. states or in Washington, D.C., cast ballots not directly for those offices, but instead for members of the Electoral College. These electors then cast direct votes, known as electoral votes, for president, and for vice president. Wikipedia

  • Daniel Webster

    American lawyer and statesman who represented New Hampshire and Massachusetts in the U.S. Congress and served as the U.S. Secretary of State under Presidents William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, and Millard Fillmore. As one of the most prominent American lawyers of the 19th century, he argued over 200 cases before the U.S. Supreme Court between 1814 and his death in 1852. Wikipedia

  • History of the Democratic Party (United States)

    Oldest voter-based political party in the world and the oldest existing political party in the United States. The party's modern institutions were formed in the 1830s and 1840s. Wikipedia

  • Martin Van Buren

    American statesman who served as the eighth President of the United States from 1837 to 1841. A founder of the Democratic Party, he had previously served as the ninth Governor of New York, the tenth United States Secretary of State, and the eighth Vice President of the United States. Wikipedia

  • Franklin Pierce

    The 14th president of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. Fundamental threat to the unity of the nation, he alienated anti-slavery groups by supporting and signing the Kansas–Nebraska Act and enforcing the Fugitive Slave Act, yet these efforts failed to stem conflict between North and South. Wikipedia

  • Free Soil Party

    Short-lived coalition political party in the United States active from 1848 to 1854, when it merged into the Republican Party. Largely focused on the single issue of opposing the expansion of slavery into the western territories of the United States. Wikipedia

  • List of United States presidential candidates. Held in 1788-1789, followed by the second in 1792. Wikipedia

  • John J. Crittenden

    American statesman and politician from the U.S. state of Kentucky. He represented the state in both the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate and twice served as United States Attorney General in the administrations of William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, and Millard Fillmore. Wikipedia

  • Origins of the American Civil War

    Historians debating the origins of the American Civil War focus on the reasons why seven Southern states (followed by four more after the onset of the war) declared their secession from the United States (the Union), why they united to form the Confederate States of America (simply known as the "Confederacy"), and why the North refused to let them go. While virtually all historians in the 21st century agree that conflicts over slavery caused the war, they disagree sharply regarding which kinds of conflict—ideological, economic, political, or social—were most important. Wikipedia

  • Complete list of people who received an electoral vote in a United States presidential election. For all elections past 1804, "P" denotes a presidential vote, and "VP" denotes a vice presidential vote. Wikipedia

  • John Quincy Adams

    American statesman, diplomat, lawyer, and diarist who served as the sixth president of the United States, from 1825 to 1829. He previously served as the eighth United States Secretary of State from 1817 to 1825. Wikipedia

  • Winfield Scott

    American military commander and political candidate. He served as a general in the United States Army from 1814 to 1861, taking part in the War of 1812, the Mexican–American War, the early stages of the American Civil War and conflicts with Native Americans. Wikipedia

  • William H. Seward

    United States Secretary of State from 1861 to 1869, and earlier served as governor of New York and as a United States Senator. Prominent figure in the Republican Party in its formative years, and was praised for his work on behalf of the Union as Secretary of State during the Civil War. Wikipedia

  • Millard Fillmore

    The 13th president of the United States, serving from 1850 to 1853, the last to be a member of the Whig Party while in the White House. Elected as the 12th U.S. Vice President in 1848, and succeeded to the presidency in July 1850 upon the death of U.S. President Zachary Taylor. Wikipedia

  • John Bell (Tennessee politician)

    American politician, attorney, and planter who was a candidate for President of the United States in the election of 1860. One of Tennessee's most prominent antebellum politicians, Bell served in the House of Representatives from 1827 to 1841, and in the Senate from 1847 to 1859. Wikipedia

  • Jacksonian democracy

    19th-century political philosophy in the United States that expanded suffrage to most white men over the age of 21, and restructured a number of federal institutions. Originating with the seventh U.S. president, Andrew Jackson and his supporters, it became the nation's dominant political worldview for a generation. Wikipedia

  • Second Party System

    Historians and political scientists use Second Party System to periodize the political party system operating in the United States from about 1828 to 1852, after the First Party System ended. Characterized by rapidly rising levels of voter interest, beginning in 1828, as demonstrated by Election Day turnouts, rallies, partisan newspapers, and high degrees of personal loyalty to parties. Wikipedia

  • John C. Calhoun

    American politician and political theorist from South Carolina who held many important positions including being the seventh vice president of the United States from 1825 to 1832, while adamantly defending slavery and protecting the interests of the white South when its residents were outnumbered by Northerners. He began his political career as a nationalist, modernizer, and proponent of a strong national government and protective tariffs. Wikipedia

  • List of United States presidential candidates by number of votes received. Elections have tended to have more participation in each successive election, due to the increasing population of the United States, and, in some instances, expansion of the right to vote to larger segments of society. Wikipedia

  • List of unsuccessful major party candidates for President of the United States

    The United States has had a two-party system for much of its history, and the major parties of the two-party system have dominated presidential elections for most of U.S. history. Since the ratification of the United States Constitution in 1788, there have been 52 unsuccessful major party candidates for President of the United States. Wikipedia

  • James Buchanan

    American lawyer and politician who served as the 15th president of the United States (1857–1861). He previously served as secretary of state (1845–1849) and represented Pennsylvania in both houses of the U.S. Congress. Wikipedia

  • Timeline of Baltimore in the 19th century

    Of the history of the city of Baltimore, Maryland, Regular U.S. Navy warships like some of the "Original Six" frigates of 1797, such as the U.S.F. Constitution (of Boston) and U.S.F. Constellation from Baltimore have several stunning victories but later get bottled up in American harbor by later British blockade of east coast, later stifling Baltimore commerce. Wikipedia

  • The United States has had a two-party system for much of its history, and the two major parties have nominated vice presidential candidates in most presidential elections. Since the ratification of the United States Constitution in 1789, there have been 59 unsuccessful major party candidates for Vice President of the United States. Wikipedia

  • Mid-Atlantic (United States)

    Region of the United States generally located in the overlap between the Northeastern and Southeastern States. Its exact definition differs upon source, but the region usually includes New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Washington, D.C., Virginia, and West Virginia. Wikipedia

  • Constitutional Union Party (United States)

    United States third party active during the 1860 elections. It consisted of conservative former Whigs, largely from the Southern United States, who wanted to avoid secession over the slavery issue and refused to join either the Republican Party or the Democratic Party. Wikipedia

  • Head of state and head of government of the United States, indirectly elected to a four-year term by the American people through the Electoral College. Commander-in-chief of the United States Armed Forces. Wikipedia

  • Democratic Party (United States)

    One of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with its main, historic rival, the Republican Party. Founded around 1828 by supporters of Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest active political party. Wikipedia

  • There have been 49 vice presidents of the United States since the office came into existence in 1789. The person who received the second most votes for president in the Electoral College. Wikipedia

  • In the United States, political parties nominate one candidate each for President of the United States and for Vice President of the United States. These candidates attempt to win presidential elections by taking a majority of the electoral vote. Wikipedia

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